Super Smash Bros Ultimate X Pokémon Sol Version

Additional Update (9/25/2019): Upon actually subscribing to the Nintendo Online Service, I found that all of these stages were taken down. I have now re-uploaded all of them, and even updated a few. There are also two new stages, one of which is a Pokémon stage. Stages that have been updated are noted as such next to their code.

Final Update: Added a total of four new non-Pokémon stages. This time it’s two Yu-Gi-Oh and two Smash Bros inspired stages. Unfortunately, my online free-trail is coming to an end, so this will be the last of my stages for the foreseeable future.

Update 3: No more Pokémon, but added a new miscellaneous stage.

Update 2: Added another Pokémon stage. I think this might be the last one.

Update: Added a new Pokémon stage. You don’t want to miss this one.

Smash Bros X Cosmic Quest.png

Remember a few months ago when I explained my vision for Tenno Region representation in Smash Bros? Well, thanks to the recent 3.0 update of Smash Brothers Ultimate and the inclusion of a rather robust Stage Builder mode, part of those visions have now become a reality. Back then, I described that the Tenno stage would be the Solar Peak Ruins. To recap, this is how I described it:

“This stage is set in Luna, Terra, and Sol’s Solar Peak Ruins, where Heliosol is found in Luna and Terra. The main floor of the stage is a raised altar above the rest of the ruins (the alter where you would encounter Heliosol). There are also two floating platforms, one over the drop-off on either side of the stage. Periodically, Heliosol will appear in the stage. It will randomly appear in its normal form or its Ascended Form. When in its standard form, it will stand in the background and randomly launch fiery attacks at the battlefield. But when it appears in its Ascended Form, it will join the battle as a boss. When it’s defeated, it will release a burst of fire and light that will cause damage to all fighters except the one who beat it. When Heliosol isn’t around, Sun-themed Pokémon such as Solrock, Solem, Volcarona, Heliolisk, Turcell, and Gigastar will appear at random in the background. They don’t do anything but stand around.”

Thanks to Stage Builder, I have been able to create this stage. Here’s an image:
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Unfortunately, I couldn’t make a boss battle against Heliosol in its Ascended Form, but I can still have Heliosol Regular Form appear in the background, and attack with waves of fire that move back and forth across the stage.

If you want to play this stage for your self, search for it with this code: 64NX9HL7 (Majorly Updated)

But that’s not all, remember in the Team Rocket Q&A Session that Meowth wanted to be represented in Smash Bros? I decided to oblige with this next stage:

Team Rocket

This stage is clearly based off of Team Rocket’s famous Meowth Balloon. The balloon gently bobs up and down as clouds pass by. A constant wind blows towards the right. Blast off with Team Rocket on this stage.

To play this Team Rocket stage, search for this code: D57Q5QSR

This next one is a personal favorite of mine:

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It’s the Temporal Tower, from Pokémon Mystery Dungeon Explorers of Time, Darkness, and Sky, the site of the fight to the finish against Primal Dialga. The two Time Gears can be stood on, and will spin.

The code for this stage is: 99MR0583 (Aesthetically Updated)

 

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This is Pokémon Go in Smash Bros stage form. The background is an accurate recreation of what the map in Pokémon Go could look like, given the area your in. It includes three PokéStops, one open, one closed, and one closed and cooling down as well as a Team Mystic (the team I’m on) gym.

Code: 326HDCHT (Slightly Updated)

NEW STAGE:

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The Sky Pillar, based upon its appearance in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.  Rayquaza wraps itself around this stage, and its head can even be stood on. Rayquaza has summoned a powerful gust of wind that blows across the top of the stage above its head.

Code: R2VX6T9P (NEW)

 

If you’re interested, here’s a quick list of some other stages I’ve made:

Tetris
Battle inside of a Tetris board. Watch as a player drops an L-block into place, and activate a bomb block to clear the board.
Code: 9H698VT2

Airship
A cannon-filled airship just like the ones originating in Super Mario Bros 3. Includes my custom-made self-firing cannon balls.
Code: 36NKJW1G

Bowser’s Castle
Designed to look like a Bowser fight from the original Super Mario Bros. You can even hit the “ax” to destroy the bridge and send your opponents plummeting into lava.
Code: HRSBX15G (Majorly Updated)

Zero Gravity
A zero-gravity battle arena that uses upward blowing wind to negate gravity. Can you avoid the asteroids as you fight your opponents in an entirely aerial battle?
Code: KBVLFTML

City Escape
A recreation of the first stage of Sonic Adventure 2. It’s set on a steep slope and features a giant truck that plows down the stage, and even leaps off a jump.
Code: KX8F9CVR

Yu-Gi-Oh! Battle City Blimp
This stage takes place atop the Kaiba Corp blimp, where the finals of Battle City were held. Also, Kaiba’s Blue-Eyes White Jet will fly over.
Code: F8KVC5Q7

Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel
A stage designed to look like the duel arena’s from season one. In it, the Blue-Eyes White Dragon and Dark Magician (with designs inspired by the Tablet of Lost Memories) do battle.
Code: S8T3KFFP

Tabuu
The final boss of Super Smash Bros Brawl’s Subspace Emissary recreated as a stage. Tabuu floats in the background and attacks with various objects.
Code: S5066RKF

Subspace (NEW STAGE)
To go along with Tabuu, it’s a stage based off of his realm, Subspace. To replicate the sidescrolling/platforming nature of The Subspace Emissary, this stage features platforming elements and a teleporter at either side so you can “infinitely” sidescroll. Also features a Primid, the basic enemy of Subspace.
Code: 4797GSXH

Galeem/Dharkon
Moving on from the final boss of Brawl to the final boss of Ultimate, this stage recreates the true final battle of World of Light. Galeem and Dharkon float in the background and each attack with their own move.
Code: 8BCWJCMD (Code Invalid, Yet to be Re-Posted)

Exploring the Pokémon Multiverse

If you haven’t seen yet, I’ve recently updated the History of the Pokémon World page with details regarding the recent Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee. Of course, Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee didn’t add to much of note to the page, seeing as Let’s Go doesn’t have too much in the way of lore, however, with this addition, I have updated the entire page to better detail page when it comes to the multiverse of Pokémon. As explained there, the page will focus and detail the four primary branches of the Pokémon Multiverse, as follows:

OU: Original Universe. The timeline introduced in the original games and seen up until Black and White 2.
MU: Mega Universe. The timeline where Mega Evolution exists, as introduced in X and Y.
UU: Ultra Universe. A minor branch off of the Mega Universe. So far, only Ultra Sun and Moon exists here.
LG:  Let’s Go Universe. The timeline where Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee takes place.

I couldn’t really detail the intricacies of the split Pokémon timeline too much on the page, so I thought I should make a post to better describe my thoughts on how this all works.

First, for those who don’t know, a multiverse is the idea that multiple parallel universes can exist. Each of the individual universes can either be almost exactly the same as another, or completely different. In the quantum theory of the multiverse, every time a choice is made, the universe splits. In one universe, one option is picked, in another, the other option is instead. This happens over and over again, in a cascading effect, quickly creating an infinite amount of universes, across which anything and everything has happened in at least one of them. These universes splitting off of each other can be thought of as a tree, where branches grow off of other branches. Some branches are tiny twigs, while others are thick limbs. Using this analogy, branches of the timeline can be grouped. Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire confirmed that Pokémon exists in a multiverse, by stating that there is another version of the Hoenn Region in another world. This is heavily implied to be the version of Hoenn seen in the original Ruby and Sapphire games, explaining the differences between the two sets of games.

So now comes the question, where did I get the “four primary branches” concept from. From the context of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire mentioned above, we know that there are at least two main branches to the Pokémon timeline. There’s the one without Mega Evolution, the Original Universe, and the one with Mega Evolution, the Mega Universe. The split occurred based on the firing of AZ’s Ultimate Weapon. The Mega Universe is where he chose to fire it, the Original Universe is where he didn’t. These two branches are the main branches of the primary four.

The next universe to be introduced is the Ultra Universe, where the events of Ultra Sun and Moon take place. Compared to the split between the Original and Mega Universes, this one is pretty small. So you can think of it as a small branch growing off of the thick limb of the Mega Universe. This universe is essentially the same as the Mega Universe, the only known major differences being those that stem directly from the actions of Necrozma. It is unknown exactly what the point of divergence is, but the main differences come from Necrozma interrupting the events at the Alter of the Sunne/Moone. It’s possible that Necrozma simply decided not to attack in the original Mega Universe, but it’s also possible that split occurred much earlier, and perhaps Necrozma was never imprisoned in the Megalo Tower to begin with in the Mega Universe. It’s impossible to know for sure.

Then there’s the Let’s Go Universe. Not much explanation is needed here. Let’s Go presents events completely differently from Red and Blue/Fire Red and Leaf Green. The main difference is that the protagonists of Let’s Go, Chase, replaces Red. Since Mega Evolution exists, it would be a branch off of the Mega Universe timeline Once again, there is no confirmation as to why this split occurred. It is my speculation that in this version, Red and Blue began their journey earlier than they did in the Original and Mega Universe, meaning that missed out on the random events that led to them becoming the trainers we know them as. However, it’s worth noting that Chase and Trace live in the Original Universe houses of Red and Blue, meaning that there are other unrelated differences to this universe as well.

All this leaves a big question. Why are Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire and Ultra Sun/Moon considered their own universe, but not Fire Red/Leaf Green and Emerald? The answer to that question is, they actually are. While the multiverse may have only been introduced officially in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, it had existed since the very beginning. In fact, the very nature of Pokémon’s dual version releases (as in releasing both Red Version and Blue Version) means that timeline splits existed with the very first Pokémon games. Red and Blue Versions both show the events, but with slightly different versions of them. That is, by definition, a presentation of parallel universe. And it doesn’t end there. Yellow Version later came out, creating a third split in the timeline. And then, ten years later, there came Fire Red and Leaf Green, creating two more versions of the same events. The reason I do not list these as separate universes is because they all just minor twigs on the same main branch of the timeline. Fire Red/Leaf Green shows essentially the same universe as Red/Blue, with minor differences, while Let’s Go Pikachu/Eevee does not. Emerald is just a slightly different version of the same events from Ruby and Sapphire, and can mostly coexist with them, but Ultra Sun/Moon has some major events that are completely different from Sun/Moon, making it a bigger divergence.

The multiverse gets even crazier when you consider the implications of the Link Cable mentioned in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. In it, the Link Cable is a mysterious item that allows Devon Corp. to send the incoming meteor to another world. So, essentially, it is a machine that allows transport and communication with other universe. Now, the Link Cable was made as a reference to the real-world object that allowed Game Boy games to connect to each other. It’s what allowed players to trade and battle with other players. Now, let’s think about the implications. In Red Version, we have one Red connecting to another Red and trading using the Link Cable. Since the first Red can now use the Pokémon received from the second one in the trade, that second Red is, technically speaking “cannon” to the first Red’s journey. The only way for this work means that literally every single save file ever created on a Pokémon game is its own parallel universe. Think about it. The Pokémon multiverse truly is infinite in its expanse.

And all that’s not even considering other big non-game branches of the timeline, such as the anime, manga, trading card, and spin-off game universe.

If any of this post doesn’t seem to make sense to you, feel free to ask in a comment. I’d be more than willing to explain better.

Episodes 81-82 Review

Wow it’s been a long time since I’ve written these episodes. Let’s see how much I can remember to bring up here.

Originally, these two episodes were planned to be only one, but they went on for so long, that I was forced to split them into two episodes. Even after the split, the second episode became the longest episode I had written up until that point.

As I explained way back in the episode 80 review, these episodes were based off of an event in Luna, Terra, and Sol. Team Planetary’s attempt to take the Grand Meteoric shard and Showakusei forces the player and Cosmo down into a previously unknown chamber beneath the Crater Cave, the Den of Mega Evolution. Just like in these episodes, the player and Cosmo are forced to team up with each other and a mysterious Raichu in order to escape, both obtaining the ability to Mega Evolve in the process. Just as in the episode, the first chance to Mega Evolve comes when battling a non-Pokémon Entity called the Abomination, which can only be damaged by Pokémon that have Mega Evolved. Because you’re paired with Cosmo, it’s a double battle against the Abomination and a randomized Phantom Mega Pokémon. Of note with this entity, the episode took a liberty in relating it to Nemex. This was something I did purely for the sake to lead into the movie. There isn’t normally an explicit link between the two. This part of the game did not exist in my original concepts for Luna, Terra, and Sol, due to the fact that I made them before Mega Evolution existed. I liked how X and Y and Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire made your first battle with a Mega Evolution a special one, so I decided to take it to the next level and make it very special. Not only that, but I made sure you built up a bond with the first Pokémon you Mega Evolve before actually performing the Mega Evolution, by making it so the Raichu is the only Pokémon you can use until you escape the Den of Mega Evolution. After doing so, the Raichu will become the player’s permanently.

I’ll get around to writing a review for the movie at some point.

Episode 68 Review

Wow, between Sun and Moon and Winter Break it’s been quite some time since my last episode. Now that that’s all over, I’ll be trying to get back into a more regular routine.

To put it simply, this episode had me stressed out. I knew I had to do a special episode to coincide with the release of Sun and Moon, but there were so many problems I had to deal with. The biggest was how little we actually knew about Sun and Moon at the time. It was easy for me to write the Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire special two years ago because even if those games hadn’t come out at the time, we already knew mostly everything about them due to the original Ruby and Sapphire. I had no such benefit this time around. To make things worse, the obvious connections between Solgaleo/Lunala and Heliosol/Seluna were just begging to be addressed in the episode, but with so little information confirmed about Solgaleo and Lunala, there was no way that I could extrapolate any well-detailed plot connections between the two. Of course now in hindsight we know that Solgaleo and Lunala have little to do with the actual Sun and Moon themselves, but before the release of game, for all we knew, they could have been the creators of the Sun and Moon, which would have caused some major problems no matter what I wrote in the special. So in the the end, I had to go with the very simple concept of turning Lunala and Solgaleo into the “emissaries” of Seluna and Heliosol. What exactly does emissary mean in this instance? I couldn’t even tell you. And as you might know if you’ve been following this sight for the past two months is that even with as simple of an explanation I gave for the connection between the two sets of Legendaries, I still had to make retcons once the games came out. I never would have even guessed that Lunala and Solgaleo were in-fact Ultra Beasts, and that little fact completely invalidated my entire description of how Heliosol and Seluna were connected to them. Now I’m left with some overly convoluted explanation that Cosmog was created when some of the Cosmic Architect’s energy fell down the first Ultra Wormhole. Oh well, not much I can do about it now short of some more retcons, which I’d rather just not do. The one other thing that gave me some issues was my guest character. Just as Steven appeared in my last special, I wanted a character from Sun and Moon to appear here. I debated between Kukui, Samson Oak, and Lillie. They all presented problems. Just as with the Legendaries, we really knew nothing about any of them at the time. What made things worse, was if I was going to claim that my series takes place after the Sun and Moon anime, then I would have to make sure I don’t contradict anything that might happen in the show with any of those characters. In the end, I went with Kukui because we had met him already in the Sun and Moon demo, allowing me to know his character and personality well enough to write for him. That, combined with trailers for the Sun and Moon anime allowed me to approximate what is to be expected from his interactions with Ash.

Pokémon Sun, Moon, and Cosmic Quest

Final Update: Over the past couple days I have finished off the remaining items on the list. Every Pokédex page has been brought up-to-date with new moves, abilities, and TM/HMs, the History of the Pokémon World page now contains references to Sun and Moon’s history, and the Sun and Moon Special Episode has now been changed to better line up with Sun and Moon’s lore. On topic of the last item on that list, when I initially wrote the episode (before the release of Sun and Moon) I decided that good generic way to link Lunala and Solgaleo to Seluna and Heliosol would be to say that the Alola Legendaries are the emissaries of the Tenno Legendaries. I figured that there would be very little that could contradict that idea presented in Sun and Moon. Little did I suspect that Lunala and Solgaleo were actually Ultra Beasts, and therefore couldn’t just be simple emissaries of Pokémon from the normal universe. My new explanation is that in the ancient past a portion of the Cosmic Architect’s energy got sucked into an Ultra Wormhole. This energy then took physical form in Ultra Space as a Cosmog, eventually turning into Solgaleo or Lunala. One last thing, there is one item on my list that remains unchecked. The Z-Move one. I have decided that until I get evidence of there being Z-Moves in regions other than the Alola Region, I will wait to make any new Z-Moves at all. Thanks for your patience during these updates.

Update 2: The initial plan in regards to TMs was to use Sun and Moon’s TM list as a base to my own list, just as I was already doing with Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire’s list. I discovered recently when looking at Sun and Moon’s list that this will not work. As HMs are not present in the games, many HMs have been turned into TMs. For obvious reasons, this does not work with my games, as I still have HMs. Another problem is that Flash and Dig were removed as TMs. This was likely done because they lost their status as a field move. Once again, they are still field moves in my games, so they need to remain as TMs. The TM list I’m using will now be a hybrid of Gen VI and Gen VII’s lists. It’s a little more confusing, but it allows me to use the new TM moves from Sun and Moon, while also making sure my list makes sense. See the New Items page for an exact break down of the hybrid list. Also, taking advantage of all these changes, I decided to add a new HM. Replacing Rock Climb as the seventh HM is a new move called Terrain Trek. In a similar manner to Rhyhorn in X and Y or Mudsdale in Sun and Moon, this move allows you to get on the back of your Pokémon and ride it across rough terrain. For details on the move, see the Attackdex.

Update: It has just come to my attention that there is a move introduced in Sun and Moon called Ice Hammer (Funny story, I learned of it when a Clefable used Metronome). As you might already know, not only is one of my moves called Ice Hammer, but it is one of the Tenno Region’s TMs, specifically the one given out by Halley after defeating his gym. As I bow to the official canon on matters like this, my Ice Hammer attack no longer exists. Depending on what I can think of, I will either give my move a new name, or come up with a new move to replace it. Fortunately, said move was never used in Cosmic Quest, so no retcons are needed there. Speaking of retcons, I am at the point in Moon Version right now where I am realizing that I might need to retcon my special episode in order to fit better with the story of Sun and Moon. More news on that to come. Both topics have been added to my to-do list.

I hope you’re all enjoying your Sun and Moon Versions, I for one sure am. These games are amazing. That being said, they put the entire Cosmic Quest project in an interesting scenario. This entire website is now out of date. Many aspects of this website were designed with games taking up the spot of a hypothetical Generation VII, but now that Sun and Moon make up Gen VII, my games are now “Gen IIX,” and the website must be updated accordingly. Over the next few weeks I will likely be too busy playing Moon Version to write any new episodes, but I should be able to get in some time here and there to update the website. Below I will post a to-do list of everything that needs to be changed, and as I make the updates, I will actively update this post so that you can know what has and hasn’t been changed. I will also keep this post pinned to the top of the home page for easy access, at least until I start writing episodes again.

To-Do List (In No Particular Order):
1. Update movesets and abilities of all Tenno Pokémon with new moves/abilities (Done)
2. Update compatible TM list of all Tenno Pokémon to reflect the new hybrid TM list. (Done)
3. Update the Light-Type page with any Alola Pokémon and/or moves that become Light-Type (if any) (Done, see page for details)
4. Add Alolan Pokémon with signature moves to the list of signature moves in the new mechanics/features page (Done. Fun fact: Every single evolution line introduced in Alola has at least one Signature move and/or ability, making my list of signature moves quite large)
5. Determine what new moves (if any) will be combo-type moves and add them to the list of the new mechanics/features page (Done, see section for details)
6. Add an Alolan representative to the Ultimate Six (now Seven) section of the new mechanics/features page (Done, please note that the protagonist of Sun and Moon currently has no official name, so I’m tentatively calling him Sun)
7. Determine what (if any) Alolan Pokémon gain Ground-Type immunity and add them to the list in the new mechanics/features page (Done, see section for details)
8. Add Alola Pokémon that can be found in the Tenno Region to the Tenno Region page’s list of example Pokémon (Done. I’ve also made a few other minor changes)
9. (I’m not sure about this one yet) Create a Z-Move section in the Attackdex and create new Z-Moves for it (Delayed until further notice)
10. Bring the History of the Pokémon  World page up-to-date with the history of the Alola Region (Done, I also added the Legends of the Johto Region, which for one reason or another was previously missing.)
11. Either rename Ice Hammer or replace it with a comparable new move (Done, the new move is Icicle Lance)
12. Retcon the Sun and Moon special episode to fall better in line with the story of Sun and Moon (Done, see the Final Update section above for more details)
13. Whatever else I might think of (That’s all for now, but who knows what else might come to me in the future)

The interesting thing to note is the ninth item on the list. Back when I started making Mega Evolutions for the website, I was torn on whether or not to do so. Even back then, I predicted that Mega Evolution was going to be the major item of Gen VI, but mean very little to the following generations,  and now, with Sun and Moon introducing no new Megas, it would seem I was right. And now because of this, I’m left with a generation taking place after the height of Mega Evolution that still introduces new Mega Evolutions. Personally, I don’t care that much, as there’s no specific reason why they’re not making new Megas anymore, and they could easily go an make new ones again later, but I’m afraid that Z-Moves might be a different story. From what I can tell so far, Z-Moves seem like they might be specific to Alola, in which case it would be odd for me to have Z-Moves in Tenno. I would love to come up with some new Z-Moves, especially a Light-Type one for parity reasons, but I’m just not sure it will turn out right if I do so. We’ll just have to wait and see. On a related note, I will not be making “Tennoan Forms” of Pokémon. Unless Regional Variants like Alolan Forms prove to be a thing outside of the Alola Region in future games, I will not be jumping on that bandwagon.

Enjoy your adventures in Alola!

Episode 60 Review

Safari Zones (and variants thereof) seem to pretty much be ignored in the anime, with the exception the episode in Kanto (which was banned). Hoenn’s Safari Zone was completely ignored while the Great Marsh in Sinnoh was used simply as the location for a random episode, the fact that it was used for Safari Games was never addressed. As Cosmic Quest is the main way to show off my ideas from Luna, Terra, and Sol, I didn’t want to leave the Park Zone out. Speaking of the Safari Zone in the anime, just as I did previously with the Porygon episode, this episode featured a joke where Ash forgot about the events that took place during a banned episode, reflecting the fact that most English viewers would have no idea what they’re talking about. Another joke this episode made was Ash failing to catch a Dunsparce. For some reason it would appear that whenever Ash tries and fails to capture a Pokémon that it’s a Dunsparce. This has been seen twice now, once in the Unova episode The Path that Leads to Goodbye and again in the Kalos episode Under the Pledging Tree. I figured if I was going to have Ash fail to capture a Pokémon, that I might as well continue the joke and make it a Dunsparce as well.

An interesting fact about this episode, and the Pokémon featured in it, is its origin. Traineed and Arborrior are actually two of some of my very earliest Pokémon (alongside “Megachu,” Delphin, and Ivine). As a child when I created these Pokémon, I would play make believe with my friends using them. One scenario that I always reused was that the person I’m playing with would be training by attacking a tree, and out of that tree a group of Traineed (back then given the uninspired name of Seedona) would fall. One of these feisty Pokémon  would challenge the trainer and end up finding a Leaf Stone (the original evolution method that I recently changed) and evolve into Arborrior (known as Treeona back then). This event would always occur before the trainer fights a Grass-Type gym (this was in a proto-region I created before Tenno). Wanting to give the trainer a Pokémon that is good against Grass-Types, I would have the captured Arborrior know Fire Punch. I took this original scenario and transformed it into this episode. If I had been able to write a longer episode, then there would have been one final battle between Arborrior and Breloom, representing the battle against the Grass gym leader.

Finally, I want to take this chance to give my opinion on Safari Zones. I’ve seen a lot of people complain about the Safari Zone and how annoying it is. I personally cannot agree with this at all. Not only do I not think it’s too difficult, but I think it’s a great thing to have. It is an area that completely changes all of the conventions about capturing Pokémon, leading to a completely unique experience found nowhere else. It adds variety to the game, and I really don’t know how that can be a bad thing. I personally hope strongly that Sun and Moon sees the return of the Safari Zone, and I don’t mean excuses like the Friend Safari or that pale imitation we see in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. I want an actual Safari Zone with an actual Safari Game.

Episode 56 Review

I’m sure just Dawn returning would have been fine, but I wanted to go all out, so I brought back not only May, but Max as well. Max returning is something I felt very strongly about. For no real reason at all he was left out the Wallace Cup episodes in Sinnoh, and that was extremely disappointing. There was no reason not to bring him back. Since he’s always with May, it’s not like it would cause any problems having him with her. So bringing Max back was the first thing I decided after deciding to bring back May. Now this being their first appearance since the release of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, obviously that would have to have an impact on them. May’s redesign being the most important impact (in case you didn’t notice, the new clothes I describe May wearing are those of her Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire counterpart). This is analogous to how May wore her outfit from Emerald in her return during Sinnoh. Giving Max the PokéNav Plus, complete with DexNav was the other major thing. I also considered giving Max new clothes, but as he has no direct in-game counterpart I had no basis to go off of, so I didn’t worry about it. One last thing to mention was I chose the plot of a fake restaurant to specifically tie into May and Max’s personalities. It provides not only the best opportunity to showcase May’s passion for food, but also gave the two siblings something to bicker over.