Exploring the Pokémon Multiverse

If you haven’t seen yet, I’ve recently updated the History of the Pokémon World page with details regarding the recent Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee. Of course, Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee didn’t add to much of note to the page, seeing as Let’s Go doesn’t have too much in the way of lore, however, with this addition, I have updated the entire page to better detail page when it comes to the multiverse of Pokémon. As explained there, the page will focus and detail the four primary branches of the Pokémon Multiverse, as follows:

OU: Original Universe. The timeline introduced in the original games and seen up until Black and White 2.
MU: Mega Universe. The timeline where Mega Evolution exists, as introduced in X and Y.
UU: Ultra Universe. A minor branch off of the Mega Universe. So far, only Ultra Sun and Moon exists here.
LG:  Let’s Go Universe. The timeline where Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee takes place.

I couldn’t really detail the intricacies of the split Pokémon timeline too much on the page, so I thought I should make a post to better describe my thoughts on how this all works.

First, for those who don’t know, a multiverse is the idea that multiple parallel universes can exist. Each of the individual universes can either be almost exactly the same as another, or completely different. In the quantum theory of the multiverse, every time a choice is made, the universe splits. In one universe, one option is picked, in another, the other option is instead. This happens over and over again, in a cascading effect, quickly creating an infinite amount of universes, across which anything and everything has happened in at least one of them. These universes splitting off of each other can be thought of as a tree, where branches grow off of other branches. Some branches are tiny twigs, while others are thick limbs. Using this analogy, branches of the timeline can be grouped. Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire confirmed that Pokémon exists in a multiverse, by stating that there is another version of the Hoenn Region in another world. This is heavily implied to be the version of Hoenn seen in the original Ruby and Sapphire games, explaining the differences between the two sets of games.

So now comes the question, where did I get the “four primary branches” concept from. From the context of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire mentioned above, we know that there are at least two main branches to the Pokémon timeline. There’s the one without Mega Evolution, the Original Universe, and the one with Mega Evolution, the Mega Universe. The split occurred based on the firing of AZ’s Ultimate Weapon. The Mega Universe is where he chose to fire it, the Original Universe is where he didn’t. These two branches are the main branches of the primary four.

The next universe to be introduced is the Ultra Universe, where the events of Ultra Sun and Moon take place. Compared to the split between the Original and Mega Universes, this one is pretty small. So you can think of it as a small branch growing off of the thick limb of the Mega Universe. This universe is essentially the same as the Mega Universe, the only known major differences being those that stem directly from the actions of Necrozma. It is unknown exactly what the point of divergence is, but the main differences come from Necrozma interrupting the events at the Alter of the Sunne/Moone. It’s possible that Necrozma simply decided not to attack in the original Mega Universe, but it’s also possible that split occurred much earlier, and perhaps Necrozma was never imprisoned in the Megalo Tower to begin with in the Mega Universe. It’s impossible to know for sure.

Then there’s the Let’s Go Universe. Not much explanation is needed here. Let’s Go presents events completely differently from Red and Blue/Fire Red and Leaf Green. The main difference is that the protagonists of Let’s Go, Chase, replaces Red. Since Mega Evolution exists, it would be a branch off of the Mega Universe timeline Once again, there is no confirmation as to why this split occurred. It is my speculation that in this version, Red and Blue began their journey earlier than they did in the Original and Mega Universe, meaning that missed out on the random events that led to them becoming the trainers we know them as. However, it’s worth noting that Chase and Trace live in the Original Universe houses of Red and Blue, meaning that there are other unrelated differences to this universe as well.

All this leaves a big question. Why are Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire and Ultra Sun/Moon considered their own universe, but not Fire Red/Leaf Green and Emerald? The answer to that question is, they actually are. While the multiverse may have only been introduced officially in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, it had existed since the very beginning. In fact, the very nature of Pokémon’s dual version releases (as in releasing both Red Version and Blue Version) means that timeline splits existed with the very first Pokémon games. Red and Blue Versions both show the events, but with slightly different versions of them. That is, by definition, a presentation of parallel universe. And it doesn’t end there. Yellow Version later came out, creating a third split in the timeline. And then, ten years later, there came Fire Red and Leaf Green, creating two more versions of the same events. The reason I do not list these as separate universes is because they all just minor twigs on the same main branch of the timeline. Fire Red/Leaf Green shows essentially the same universe as Red/Blue, with minor differences, while Let’s Go Pikachu/Eevee does not. Emerald is just a slightly different version of the same events from Ruby and Sapphire, and can mostly coexist with them, but Ultra Sun/Moon has some major events that are completely different from Sun/Moon, making it a bigger divergence.

The multiverse gets even crazier when you consider the implications of the Link Cable mentioned in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. In it, the Link Cable is a mysterious item that allows Devon Corp. to send the incoming meteor to another world. So, essentially, it is a machine that allows transport and communication with other universe. Now, the Link Cable was made as a reference to the real-world object that allowed Game Boy games to connect to each other. It’s what allowed players to trade and battle with other players. Now, let’s think about the implications. In Red Version, we have one Red connecting to another Red and trading using the Link Cable. Since the first Red can now use the Pokémon received from the second one in the trade, that second Red is, technically speaking “cannon” to the first Red’s journey. The only way for this work means that literally every single save file ever created on a Pokémon game is its own parallel universe. Think about it. The Pokémon multiverse truly is infinite in its expanse.

And all that’s not even considering other big non-game branches of the timeline, such as the anime, manga, trading card, and spin-off game universe.

If any of this post doesn’t seem to make sense to you, feel free to ask in a comment. I’d be more than willing to explain better.

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Episodes 81-82 Review

Wow it’s been a long time since I’ve written these episodes. Let’s see how much I can remember to bring up here.

Originally, these two episodes were planned to be only one, but they went on for so long, that I was forced to split them into two episodes. Even after the split, the second episode became the longest episode I had written up until that point.

As I explained way back in the episode 80 review, these episodes were based off of an event in Luna, Terra, and Sol. Team Planetary’s attempt to take the Grand Meteoric shard and Showakusei forces the player and Cosmo down into a previously unknown chamber beneath the Crater Cave, the Den of Mega Evolution. Just like in these episodes, the player and Cosmo are forced to team up with each other and a mysterious Raichu in order to escape, both obtaining the ability to Mega Evolve in the process. Just as in the episode, the first chance to Mega Evolve comes when battling a non-Pokémon Entity called the Abomination, which can only be damaged by Pokémon that have Mega Evolved. Because you’re paired with Cosmo, it’s a double battle against the Abomination and a randomized Phantom Mega Pokémon. Of note with this entity, the episode took a liberty in relating it to Nemex. This was something I did purely for the sake to lead into the movie. There isn’t normally an explicit link between the two. This part of the game did not exist in my original concepts for Luna, Terra, and Sol, due to the fact that I made them before Mega Evolution existed. I liked how X and Y and Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire made your first battle with a Mega Evolution a special one, so I decided to take it to the next level and make it very special. Not only that, but I made sure you built up a bond with the first Pokémon you Mega Evolve before actually performing the Mega Evolution, by making it so the Raichu is the only Pokémon you can use until you escape the Den of Mega Evolution. After doing so, the Raichu will become the player’s permanently.

I’ll get around to writing a review for the movie at some point.

Mega Ferntress

Mega Ferntress
Description: The ferns that encompass Ferntress now grow even stronger and gain additional strength by weaving into armor plating, increasing its Defense and Special Defense. The shields on its arms are the strongest points on its body. Its lower legs have also grown quite strong, so that it may better withstand incoming attacks.
Mega Stone: Ferntrite Ferntressite
Type: Grass/Ground
Mega Ability: Bulletproof

Trivia: The claws on Mega Ferntress’ feet can dig down into the ground, to help it withstand incoming attacks without being forced back. While it may be able to walk on two legs after Mega Evolving, its large and bulky body is not optimized for this kind of movement. Therefore, its preference is to stand absolutely still and block any incoming attacks instead of dodging.

Pokémon Sun, Moon, and Cosmic Quest

Final Update: Over the past couple days I have finished off the remaining items on the list. Every Pokédex page has been brought up-to-date with new moves, abilities, and TM/HMs, the History of the Pokémon World page now contains references to Sun and Moon’s history, and the Sun and Moon Special Episode has now been changed to better line up with Sun and Moon’s lore. On topic of the last item on that list, when I initially wrote the episode (before the release of Sun and Moon) I decided that good generic way to link Lunala and Solgaleo to Seluna and Heliosol would be to say that the Alola Legendaries are the emissaries of the Tenno Legendaries. I figured that there would be very little that could contradict that idea presented in Sun and Moon. Little did I suspect that Lunala and Solgaleo were actually Ultra Beasts, and therefore couldn’t just be simple emissaries of Pokémon from the normal universe. My new explanation is that in the ancient past a portion of the Cosmic Architect’s energy got sucked into an Ultra Wormhole. This energy then took physical form in Ultra Space as a Cosmog, eventually turning into Solgaleo or Lunala. One last thing, there is one item on my list that remains unchecked. The Z-Move one. I have decided that until I get evidence of there being Z-Moves in regions other than the Alola Region, I will wait to make any new Z-Moves at all. Thanks for your patience during these updates.

Update 2: The initial plan in regards to TMs was to use Sun and Moon’s TM list as a base to my own list, just as I was already doing with Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire’s list. I discovered recently when looking at Sun and Moon’s list that this will not work. As HMs are not present in the games, many HMs have been turned into TMs. For obvious reasons, this does not work with my games, as I still have HMs. Another problem is that Flash and Dig were removed as TMs. This was likely done because they lost their status as a field move. Once again, they are still field moves in my games, so they need to remain as TMs. The TM list I’m using will now be a hybrid of Gen VI and Gen VII’s lists. It’s a little more confusing, but it allows me to use the new TM moves from Sun and Moon, while also making sure my list makes sense. See the New Items page for an exact break down of the hybrid list. Also, taking advantage of all these changes, I decided to add a new HM. Replacing Rock Climb as the seventh HM is a new move called Terrain Trek. In a similar manner to Rhyhorn in X and Y or Mudsdale in Sun and Moon, this move allows you to get on the back of your Pokémon and ride it across rough terrain. For details on the move, see the Attackdex.

Update: It has just come to my attention that there is a move introduced in Sun and Moon called Ice Hammer (Funny story, I learned of it when a Clefable used Metronome). As you might already know, not only is one of my moves called Ice Hammer, but it is one of the Tenno Region’s TMs, specifically the one given out by Halley after defeating his gym. As I bow to the official canon on matters like this, my Ice Hammer attack no longer exists. Depending on what I can think of, I will either give my move a new name, or come up with a new move to replace it. Fortunately, said move was never used in Cosmic Quest, so no retcons are needed there. Speaking of retcons, I am at the point in Moon Version right now where I am realizing that I might need to retcon my special episode in order to fit better with the story of Sun and Moon. More news on that to come. Both topics have been added to my to-do list.

I hope you’re all enjoying your Sun and Moon Versions, I for one sure am. These games are amazing. That being said, they put the entire Cosmic Quest project in an interesting scenario. This entire website is now out of date. Many aspects of this website were designed with games taking up the spot of a hypothetical Generation VII, but now that Sun and Moon make up Gen VII, my games are now “Gen IIX,” and the website must be updated accordingly. Over the next few weeks I will likely be too busy playing Moon Version to write any new episodes, but I should be able to get in some time here and there to update the website. Below I will post a to-do list of everything that needs to be changed, and as I make the updates, I will actively update this post so that you can know what has and hasn’t been changed. I will also keep this post pinned to the top of the home page for easy access, at least until I start writing episodes again.

To-Do List (In No Particular Order):
1. Update movesets and abilities of all Tenno Pokémon with new moves/abilities (Done)
2. Update compatible TM list of all Tenno Pokémon to reflect the new hybrid TM list. (Done)
3. Update the Light-Type page with any Alola Pokémon and/or moves that become Light-Type (if any) (Done, see page for details)
4. Add Alolan Pokémon with signature moves to the list of signature moves in the new mechanics/features page (Done. Fun fact: Every single evolution line introduced in Alola has at least one Signature move and/or ability, making my list of signature moves quite large)
5. Determine what new moves (if any) will be combo-type moves and add them to the list of the new mechanics/features page (Done, see section for details)
6. Add an Alolan representative to the Ultimate Six (now Seven) section of the new mechanics/features page (Done, please note that the protagonist of Sun and Moon currently has no official name, so I’m tentatively calling him Sun)
7. Determine what (if any) Alolan Pokémon gain Ground-Type immunity and add them to the list in the new mechanics/features page (Done, see section for details)
8. Add Alola Pokémon that can be found in the Tenno Region to the Tenno Region page’s list of example Pokémon (Done. I’ve also made a few other minor changes)
9. (I’m not sure about this one yet) Create a Z-Move section in the Attackdex and create new Z-Moves for it (Delayed until further notice)
10. Bring the History of the Pokémon  World page up-to-date with the history of the Alola Region (Done, I also added the Legends of the Johto Region, which for one reason or another was previously missing.)
11. Either rename Ice Hammer or replace it with a comparable new move (Done, the new move is Icicle Lance)
12. Retcon the Sun and Moon special episode to fall better in line with the story of Sun and Moon (Done, see the Final Update section above for more details)
13. Whatever else I might think of (That’s all for now, but who knows what else might come to me in the future)

The interesting thing to note is the ninth item on the list. Back when I started making Mega Evolutions for the website, I was torn on whether or not to do so. Even back then, I predicted that Mega Evolution was going to be the major item of Gen VI, but mean very little to the following generations,  and now, with Sun and Moon introducing no new Megas, it would seem I was right. And now because of this, I’m left with a generation taking place after the height of Mega Evolution that still introduces new Mega Evolutions. Personally, I don’t care that much, as there’s no specific reason why they’re not making new Megas anymore, and they could easily go an make new ones again later, but I’m afraid that Z-Moves might be a different story. From what I can tell so far, Z-Moves seem like they might be specific to Alola, in which case it would be odd for me to have Z-Moves in Tenno. I would love to come up with some new Z-Moves, especially a Light-Type one for parity reasons, but I’m just not sure it will turn out right if I do so. We’ll just have to wait and see. On a related note, I will not be making “Tennoan Forms” of Pokémon. Unless Regional Variants like Alolan Forms prove to be a thing outside of the Alola Region in future games, I will not be jumping on that bandwagon.

Enjoy your adventures in Alola!

Episode 47 Review

As is obvious, this episode is the continuation of the story presented in the episodes Electric Shock Showdown and Pika and Goliath, both of which presented Pikachu with a challenging Raichu opponent, and the option to Evolve. The idea to do such an episode came to my mind when I was trying to think of ways to use Mega Raichu in the story. I realized that Mega Raichu could step up the story entirely. I did have one problem though. I am against the idea of having random trainers use Mega Evolutions, so I didn’t want some random character of the day to be using this Mega Raichu. Initially I considered having this be a rematch with Lt. Surge, but decided against that. Then I realized how perfect Ritchie could be for this. He’s a great choice for a trainer who can Mega Evolve, as he was shown to have a deep bond with his Pokémon. Also, him defeating Ash and Pikachu would mean a lot more than just some random trainer with a Raichu would. So I made the call to have Ritchie Evolve Sparky, which also served as an additional reason for Ash and Pikachu to reconsider their decision of not Evolving. The rest of the episode pretty much wrote itself from there.

One other interesting thing worth talking about is the origin of Mega Raichu. It actually has a history hearkening back to the first ever Pokémon I created. One day as a young child I was watching an episode of Pokémon. It occurred to me that Pikachu really deserved to Evolve. I had yet to see the Electric Shock Showdown episode, and didn’t even know that Raichu existed. So I decided to design Pikachu’s Evolution myself. So I took out some crayons and paper and created what I dubbed Megachu, the Evolution of Pikachu. It was this creation that would inspire me to eventually create an entire region and game concepts, which would eventually turn into Cosmic Quest. Eventually I did learn about Raichu’s existence, but since Megachu was the first ever Pokémon I created, I couldn’t let go of it, so I made it instead an Evolution of Raichu. Now at this time I did not know about Pichu. Once I learned about Pichu I was stubborn enough to say that Pikachu is so special that it gets to have four Pokémon in its Evolution line. Of course, as time went on I dropped the concept of Megachu entirely. But then X and Y introduced Mega Evolution. Not only was it technically a fourth stage of Evolution, but it even had Mega in the name. It was perfect. So Megachu was reincarnated as Mega Raichu.

Train on!

Mega Raichu

Mega Raichu
Description: Having undergone Mega Evolution, Raichu’s ability to generate electricity has gone into overdrive. It creates so much electricity that the excess must be released as random jolts of energy across its body, primarily at its cheeks, tails, and ears. To make up for the speed and agility it loses upon Evolving from Pikachu, Mega Raichu’s largest stat increase is to its Speed. It also gains increased Attack and Special Attack.
Mega Stone: Raichite Raichite
Type: Electric
Mega Ability: Mold Breaker

Trivia: Mega Raichu incorporates design aspects from Pikachu. As Pikachu is given so much more attention than Raichu, this is Raichu both evolving to become more powerful while also reverting back to become more popular.

Train On!

(Mega) Solurtle

Solurtle
Classification: The Solar Powered Pokémon
Type: Fire/Steel
Description: Solurtle can sustain itself with nothing but energy from the sun. It will spend any extra time it has basking in the sun, absorbing energy for when it needs it.
Evolves from Turtsol at level 36
Mega Evolves into Mega Solurtle with Solurtite

Mega Solurtle
Description: Upon Mega Evolving, Solurtle’s solar panels now cover a larger percentage of its body, allowing it to absorb even more sunlight. These panels also double as armor. Because of this, Mega Solurtle gains a boost in Special Attack, Defense, and Special Defense, but the bulk of the armor causes a decrease in Speed.
Mega Stone: Solurtite
Type: Fire/Steel
Mega Ability: Drought

Trivia: Solurtle’s solar panels are the most efficient means known of transferring energy from the sun into usable power, with a nearly 100% conversion rate. When it Mega Evolves it obtains a true 100% conversion rate. Solurtle was the inspiration of solar power.

In-depth page

Also, the Movedex now includes two new moves for Solurtle.

As a random side note, happy 30th birthday Mario! I hope you have at least another successful 30 years ahead of you!