Kappaquarius

Kappaquarius
Classification: The Psychic Kappa Pokémon
Type: Water/Psychic
Description: This Pokémon can swim through water at incredible velocities by using its psychic powers to increase its hydrodynamics as well as to propel itself. While in a body of water, the liquid around it becomes an extension of its own body.
Evolves from Kappaqueous at level 36

Trivia: This Pokémon has been known to use its psychic powers to cloak itself in water while traveling across land, allowing it to keep its skin moist. Given the fact that it can also control the pressure and temperature of the water around it, those who believe it was originally an alien from outer space suggest that it might have traveled to Earth in a similar way.

In-Depth Page

Also, you may have noticed that poll on the side of your screen. I’ve always said that you can’t really pick your starter Pokémon until you’ve seen their fully evolved form. Well now that all three Tenno Starters have their final forms revealed, it’s time to chose. Please select your favorite Tenno Starter, the one you would pick if Luna, Terra, and Sol Versions were real. My personal choice is Turcell.

Episode 72 Review

First off, remember that Cosmic Chronicles Review I promised last time? Sorry about that, I’ve been too busy to get around to it. Hopefully I’ll have it up within the next two days.

As you are well aware by now, this episode was the first of a multi-episode space camp arc. I was inspired to write these episodes by the fact that it seems like almost every region has its own summer camp arc of some kind, such the ones seen in the Sinnoh episode Camping it Up, or the Kalos episode Summer of Discovery. However, this being the Tenno Region, obviously that summer camp had to be a space camp instead. And on that train of thought, what better way to start off a space camp experience than actually travelling into outer space? That’s pretty much the origin of the episode’s plot.

Speaking of the Cosmic Chronicles from earlier, another important factor of this episode was the introduction of the character Braydon to Cosmic Quest. If you haven’t read the Cosmic Chronicles (which you really should), then you should know that Braydon first appeared in Chapter 2 of the Cosmic Chronicles. Braydon originates as the rival in Luna, Terra, and Sol Versions. As such, he is automatically linked to the character Brandon from Cosmic Chronicles, as he is the main playable character, so it was natural to introduce him there. But like other rivals from the game, such as Gary, Barry, and Bianca, it made sense to also introduce him to Cosmic Quest as a rival for Ash. As Braydon came from Launch Town, the space camp arc seemed like the perfect way to bring him into Cosmic Quest, and since the episode of Cosmic Chronicles took place immediately before this episode, it was the perfect way to make a connection between the two series. Braydon is actually the first major connection to be made.

Episode 65 Review

To be perfectly honest, of the two months I went without posting an episode, I spent a month and a half writing this episode. I had originally planned on having it posted within a week of starting, but things kept on coming up. Before I knew it, a month and a half had passed. Sorry about that…

Anyways, after defeating the the Versal City Gym in Luna, Terra, and Sol Versions, the player gains access to the HM Fly and is supposed to use it to get back to Tenno Minor fast so the can use the now open path in Crater Gate to get to Crater Town and the next gym. For obvious reasons this isn’t how Ash and friends are going to be getting back there, and they needed a reason too. I had been toying around with the idea of having Professor Pine host a space camp, and figured that it would be the perfect excuse to get Ash and the others back to Tenno Minor. As for the hot air balloon ride, I used that because it was a form of travel yet to be truly used by Ash. In hindsight, it really seems odd that Ash has yet to use a hot air balloon for travel, just because of how it would annoy Team Rocket.

As for the Pokémon introduced in this episode, Calumba (who’s name comes from calm + columba, the scientific name for a dove), it’s worth pointing out that it is meant to act as a counterpart to the Pokémon Ravenoir, One’s a Dark/Flying, the other Light/Flying, one evolves with a Dusk Stone, the other with a Shiny Stone (I really wanted it to be a Dawn Stone for the obvious parallelism, but apparently the Dawn Stone’s name is completely different in the Japanese version, and has nothing to do with light), one is a bad omen, the brings peace and serenity, and their movesets are extremely similar (which will be seen once I post Calumba’s in-depth page).

Episode 63 Review

First off, my most sincere apologies for how long it has been since the last episode. I’ve gotten a job for the summer, and have been extremely busy because of it. It shames me to say this, but it will probably be slim pickings on episodes for the rest of the summer.

Anyways, this entire episode stemmed from a random idea I had back when I first started Cosmic Quest. I thought it would be an interesting idea to have James compete in a gym battle. Obviously for this to happen I needed a good excuse. I soon thought that a good excuse would be to have a gym leader who was once a member of Team Rocket. I looked through all of my gym leader designs and decided that Halley was the one most in need of extra backstory, so Halley became an ex-member of Team Rocket. As for how this is reflected in the games, I decided to make it so that games never directly state that Halley used to be part of Team Rocket, but they do heavily hint at him having a hidden past. It would be left up to the players to theorize what that history is.

Cosmic Quest’s Second Anniversary

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Two years ago today I posted the first chapter of Cosmic Quest and this whole thing began. Sadly, unlike last year where I was able to give you guys the cover artworks of Luna and Terra, I have no special way to celebrate this year. So instead, why don’t we take a look at some of the statistics of Cosmic Quest and Luna, Terra, and Sol Version.

Cosmic Quest Stats:
Episodes: 63
Views: 32,752
Favorites: 76
Follows: 62
Reviews: 106
Total Words: 273,862

Website Stats:
Posts: 189
Pages: 67
Views: 31,717

Tenno Region Stats:
New Pokémon: 50
New Mega Evolutions: 6
New Forms: 3
Characters: 15
New Moves: 85
New Abilities: 28
New Items: 32

So let me take this chance to thank all of you for making this all possible. Here’s hoping the next year is as good as the last.

Episode 62 Review

Sorry it’s been so long. Let’s see what I can remember.

As is probably obvious by now, Mahemoth is one of the Tenno Region’s two fossil Pokémon. Instead of going for ancient invertebrates and/or dinosaurs like we normally see, I decided to go with something slightly different and make a fossil from the Ice Age. Frostover Island itself is the actual location in-game where you can obtain your choice of fossil. Speaking of Frostover Island, one minor liberty taken by this episode is the island. In Luna, Terra, and Sol, the only way to get to Frostover Island is by surfing, and Surf is not available until later in the game, so you have to fly back to Versal once you get it. Frostover Island is meant to be a location for the trainer to explore and to serve as a training location. It has no real reason to exist as far as the story is concerned, but between the training options there, the Ice-Types that can only be found there, and the fossil given as a reward for making it to the end of the glacial tunnels, it’s not a pointless location.

Episode 60 Review

Safari Zones (and variants thereof) seem to pretty much be ignored in the anime, with the exception the episode in Kanto (which was banned). Hoenn’s Safari Zone was completely ignored while the Great Marsh in Sinnoh was used simply as the location for a random episode, the fact that it was used for Safari Games was never addressed. As Cosmic Quest is the main way to show off my ideas from Luna, Terra, and Sol, I didn’t want to leave the Park Zone out. Speaking of the Safari Zone in the anime, just as I did previously with the Porygon episode, this episode featured a joke where Ash forgot about the events that took place during a banned episode, reflecting the fact that most English viewers would have no idea what they’re talking about. Another joke this episode made was Ash failing to catch a Dunsparce. For some reason it would appear that whenever Ash tries and fails to capture a Pokémon that it’s a Dunsparce. This has been seen twice now, once in the Unova episode The Path that Leads to Goodbye and again in the Kalos episode Under the Pledging Tree. I figured if I was going to have Ash fail to capture a Pokémon, that I might as well continue the joke and make it a Dunsparce as well.

An interesting fact about this episode, and the Pokémon featured in it, is its origin. Traineed and Arborrior are actually two of some of my very earliest Pokémon (alongside “Megachu,” Delphin, and Ivine). As a child when I created these Pokémon, I would play make believe with my friends using them. One scenario that I always reused was that the person I’m playing with would be training by attacking a tree, and out of that tree a group of Traineed (back then given the uninspired name of Seedona) would fall. One of these feisty Pokémon  would challenge the trainer and end up finding a Leaf Stone (the original evolution method that I recently changed) and evolve into Arborrior (known as Treeona back then). This event would always occur before the trainer fights a Grass-Type gym (this was in a proto-region I created before Tenno). Wanting to give the trainer a Pokémon that is good against Grass-Types, I would have the captured Arborrior know Fire Punch. I took this original scenario and transformed it into this episode. If I had been able to write a longer episode, then there would have been one final battle between Arborrior and Breloom, representing the battle against the Grass gym leader.

Finally, I want to take this chance to give my opinion on Safari Zones. I’ve seen a lot of people complain about the Safari Zone and how annoying it is. I personally cannot agree with this at all. Not only do I not think it’s too difficult, but I think it’s a great thing to have. It is an area that completely changes all of the conventions about capturing Pokémon, leading to a completely unique experience found nowhere else. It adds variety to the game, and I really don’t know how that can be a bad thing. I personally hope strongly that Sun and Moon sees the return of the Safari Zone, and I don’t mean excuses like the Friend Safari or that pale imitation we see in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. I want an actual Safari Zone with an actual Safari Game.