Regarding the Recent Meltan Episodes and an Opinion Piece on Legendary Pokémon

SPOILER ALERT!
The following post discusses major events of the two most recent episodes of Pokémon Sun and Moon to air in English.

If you follow both Cosmic Quest and Sun and Moon, then you should know that the most recent episodes to come out in English, the two Meltan episodes, completely contradict Cosmic Quest’s Let’s Go special, Let’s Go, Meltan. The major contradictions would be Ash, in Cosmic Quest, claiming he’d love to catch a Meltan, even though he actually has in Alola, and him claiming they were never before discovered while in Alola, even though Cosmic Quest claims he and Gary first discovered Meltan while they were in Kanto.

Because Cosmic Quest takes place in the same continuity as the actual show, these are issues that I cannot allow to exist. I have made minor retcons to small contradictions before (such as Brock not knowing about Ash having traveled to Alola), but this is an extremely major one. This is such a large retcon, that I’m likely going to have to rewrite much of Let’s Go, Meltan to fix these contradictions. I don’t know exactly what I’ll do yet, but stay tuned for more news on this update.

Opinion Piece Ahead

I just have to express how disappointed I am in the writers of the show. Legandary Pokémon (and Mythical Pokémon such as Meltan by extension) are extremely special Pokémon, and with that status comes a certain weight. Normal trainers, such as Ash, should absolutely under no circumstances be catching one. It’s one thing for special trainers like Brandon (the Frontier Brain) or Tobias to have them, but Ash is no where near that level yet. By having a normal trainer like Ash capture one, we are suddenly normalizing them, making them not as special or valuable. The fact that Ash is also a character that appears in every episode only serves to further devalue the Legendary status. Not only are they devaluing Legendary Pokémon by having Ash capture one, but they are setting a horrible precedent. Up until now, people have baselessly complained that Ash never catches Legendary Pokémon. Now those same people will expect this to become the new normal. The writers have opened a massive Pandora’s Box, from which there is no return. I hope they realize what they have done.

Advertisements

Velocivity

Velocivity
Classification: The Lightspeed Pokémon
Type: Light
Description: This Legendary Pokémon is said to be made of crystallized light, allowing it to run at the speed of light. It is virtually never seen, as it is not visible when running at max speed.
Does not evolve

Trivia: Velocivity is known to exist because it takes interest in certain individuals and reveals itself to them. Velocivity will travel around the globe several thousand times per day. Not only can it travel at the speed of light, but it can also process its surroundings and react at the speed of light.

Signature Move:
Lightspeed Dash
The user attacks at the speed of light. This attack hits before any other move, no matter what.
In-Depth Description: This move has a speed priority of +6, meaning that it has priority even before moves like Extreme Speed, Protect, or Helping Hand.
Type: Light
Category: Physical
Power: 110
Accuracy: 100
PP: 5

Signature Ability:
Speed of Light
Gives priority to Light-Type moves.

In-Depth Page

Episode 99 Review

Normally, when it comes to the game release tie-in episodes, there’s plenty of different things that can be used to make a episode out of, whether it be cover Legendaries, characters, or plot elements. But Let’s Go presented an interesting problem. It has no cover Legendaries, I’ve already cameoed most of the important Kanto characters, and Kanto games have so little story, that there’s not really anything I can tie-in with. Just about the only notable thing about Let’s Go is that it’s a return to Kanto. So, that why I came up with the idea of going back to Ash’s Kanto days. This allowed Ash to experience a return to the classic region alongside us.

From the moment it was revealed, I knew I had to use Meltan, and later on Melmetal, as a major plot point of the episode. I held off on planning the story, just in case some interesting lore behind the new Pokémon was revealed. Unfortunately, no such information existed, so the Meltan story ended up relatively simple. Bringing Gary was something that was obvious to me to do, as it allowed for both a Pikachu and an Eevee to appear prominently in the episode. If you ask me, Ash and Gary didn’t interact nearly enough in Kanto, so this is partly my way of rectifying that.

Specifically, this episode took place between the episodes Bye Bye Butterfree and Abra and the Psychic Showdown, as evidenced by Ash discussing releasing Butterfree, and how he would win at the Saffron Gym in its name. When Gary shows his gym badges, he doesn’t have the Marsh Badge from Saffron, and this explains why. In order to reinforce the point in the series this episode took place, I only had Ash’s Pokémon use moves that they had used up until that point in the show.

Of note, Gary wasn’t shown to have an Eevee until the very end of the Oragne Islands, right before Johto. It might seem like a contradiction to give him an Eevee here,  but never was it implied that Gary had only just captured the Eevee. More specifically, when Gary sent Eevee into battle against Ash, Ash showed no surprise that he had an Eevee. Similarly, Gary was not confirmed to have chosen Squirtle as his starter until the Johto League, when he used his Blastoise against Ash. Once again, though, Ash showed no surprise at the fact that Gary had a Blastoise, implying he knew that Gary picked Squirtle. Lastly, Ash and Gary didn’t have their first battle until that time were Gary first used Eevee. In order to maintain continuity, I had to have Ash and Gary call off their battle before it really began, which is a bit of a shame.

One final note on Meltan/Melmetal. In this episode, I listed its evolution requirement as gathering 100 Meltan. Clearly the Pokémon has no official evolution method, as it can only be evolved in Pokémon Go. However, in Go, it takes 400 Meltan Candies to evolve a Meltan into Melmetal. Since, under normal circumstance, catching a Pokémon grants three candies, and releasing gives a fourth, it would require 100 Meltan (ignoring the use of items and events) to evolve a Melmetal. This also lines up with an early promotional video of Meltan, which emphasized multiple Meltan appearing, huddling together, and then a silhouette of Melmetal appears.

Challengers Approaching! New Foes Have Appeared!

Well, here we are. Super Smash Bros Ultimate has arrived at long last. I truly cannot wait until I can get my hands on the game. The newest entry in one of my favorite video game franchises next to Pokémon has gotten me thinking, if Luna, Terra, and Sol were real Pokémon games, then how would they be represented in Smash Bros? If you’ve wondered the same, then wonder no more. The answer is here.

Given how important Legendary Pokémon are to Smash Bros, I find it quite surprising that we only have one Legendary Pokémon as a playable character in the games with Mewtwo. The reason for this almost certainly boils down to the fact that most Legendary Pokémon are not humanoid in shape (which may not be a requirement for Smash Bros, but certainly helps) and too big. Of course, Ridley has now proven that size can be negotiable. With that, I propose these two new characters for Smash Bros.

Smash Bros Terratlas.png

Terratlas would serve as slow heavy-weight character. It would be as tall as Ridley in Smash Bros, but also bulkier, due to it’s body shape, making it the most massive character in Smash Bros. This would, in turn, make it one of the slowest characters, but its power would more than make up for that low speed. Here’s a basic summary of its moves:

B: Brine: Terratlas attacks with a pulse of water from its body. As Terratlas takes damage, this move increases in power, size, and range.

Down-B:  Earthquake: Terratlas stomps the ground, creating an earthquake in the vicinity directly around it. This will stun and cause damage to any opponent in close proximity. In addition, this will cause a minor amount of damage to opponents standing on the same floor as Terratlas. The damage at a distance caused by this attack decrease each time it is used.

Side-B: Earth Power: Terratlas causes the ground in a line of sight of it to erupt. The attack is slow moving, but has very strong launching power if contact is made.

Up-B: Seismic Toss: Terratlas leaps straight up in to the air. As it travels upwards, if it contacts any opponent, Terratlas will grab them. Once at the peak of the jump, Terratlas will hurl the captured opponent straight down. If used over a ledge, the opponent can recover, but only if they act fast.

A Attacks: Various basic attacks that aren’t worth detailing.

Side-Smash: Blizzard: Terratlas summons a short ranged blizzard. At full charge, it might freeze the target.

Up-Smash: Geyser Strike: A forceful jet of water is sent above. Longer range the longer it’s charged.

Down-Smash: Seismic Manipulation: Attacks the ground beneath it powerfully.

Final Smash: Firma Force Of Nature: All it once, a rain, hail, and sandstorm begins. Terratlas leaps in to the air and absorbs nature’s energy all around it, then slams downwards in a semi-controllable trajectory that results in a shock wave. Afterwards, the weather created lingers for a period of time, during which Terratlas’ B attacks are powered up.

Smash Bros Seluna.png

Seluna, while being quite tall, would be much more agile than most of the larger characters. It’s moves  may be weaker than Terratlas’ because of this, but Seluna can still pack a punch.

B: Lunar Beam: Seluna attacks with a beam of shadowy energy. The attack can be charged, and the longer it’s charged for, the thicker the beam, longer, and more powerful the beam will be.

Down-B: Moonlight: As long as the button is held, Seluna will slowly heal over time.

Side-B: Moonblast: A phantasmal moon appears above Seluna, and aims an attack at the closest opponent. The attack has little to no knock back, and doesn’t o the most damage, but will almost always hit.

Up-B: Stone Edge: Seluna causes rocky spikes to jet out from beneath. These spikes will cause damage and knock back to anyone they hit as the emerge, and fling Seluna up into the air. If used on the ground, these spikes will linger for a short period. or until the move is used again. Anyone besides Seluna that touches these spikes will take minor damage.

A Attacks: Various basic attacks not worth detailing.

Side-Smash: Nightstorm: Seluna attacks with a snap of dark energy right in front of it.

Up-Smash: Ancient Power: Seluna hurls power-infused boulders straight up.

Down-Smash: Night Shade: A pulse of shadow emanates downwards from Seluna.

Final Smash: Apogee Tidal Power: A massive full Moon appears in the sky and Seluna calls upon its energy in order to attack with a massive beam of silvery lunar energy. The full Moon lingers for a short period afterwards, powering up all of Seluna’s B moves.

 

Now, you’re probably wondering, what about Heliosol? Well, we also need a new stage, don’t we? Let’s solve both those problems.

Solar Peak: This stage is set in Luna, Terra, and Sol’s Solar Peak Ruins, where Heliosol is found in Luna and Terra. The main floor of the stage is a raised altar above the rest of the ruins (the alter where you would encounter Heliosol). There are also two floating platforms, one over the drop-off on either side of the stage. Periodically, Heliosol will appear in the stage. It will randomly appear in its normal form or its Ascended Form. When in its standard form, it will stand in the background and randomly launch fiery attacks at the battlefield. But when it appears in its Ascended Form, it will join the battle as a boss. When it’s defeated, it will release a burst of fire and light that will cause damage to all fighters except the one who beat it. When Heliosol isn’t around, Sun-themed Pokémon such as Solrock, Solem, Volcarona, Heliolisk, Turcell, and Gigastar will appear at random in the background. They don’t do anything but stand around.

 

Now, there’s one more way that Pokémon is represented in Smash Bros. Pokéball Pokémon. So, of course, there’s got to be some Tenno ones.

Buffern: Buffern will follow the fighter who summoned it around the battle field, and use its ferns to shield them from certain attacks. Buffern will disappear either after a short time, or taking enough damage.

Solurtle: Solurtle will use Rapid Spin and Heat Wave, attack around the field at random.

Kappaqua: Kappaqua will stand in one place and hurl Aqua Bombs at anyone who gets near it.

Calumba: The Pokémon will fly around the field, using Aroma Therapy to heal the fighters, giving a preference to the one who called it out.

Noxic: Noxic will float around the field. Anyone who touches it will take damage over time for a short amount of time due to poisoning.

Beetundra: Betundra will roll its snowball around the field, and it will get bigger the more it moves. If a player touches the snowball, they will be knocked away. The bigger the snowball, the bigger the knock back.

Boodini: The magician Pokémon will disappear and reappear at random. Whenever it appears, it will attack.

Gravisaac: While Gravisaac is on the field, gravity will randomly change between being more and less intense.

Myoken: Myoken will guide the fighters to treasure, such as CDs or Trophies.

 

And that’s it. Now enjoy all your smashing!

Pokémon Cosmic Quest the Movie 2: Nemex Unleashed

Movie 2 Poster Version 2

It’s been a very long time coming, but the second Cosmic Quest movie is finally here! Read it here. Trust me, you don’t want to miss this one.

An evil known as Nemex has continuously wiped out life on Earth in an endless cycle of destruction, and the time for it to assert its influence has come once again. An unsuspecting Ash has a great destiny thrust upon him when he learns he must join the Legendary Pokémon of Sun, Heliosol, in combat to stop Nemex, but all Ash wants to do is save Pikachu. Includes the Pikachu Short, Detective Pikachu and the Case of the Coin Caper!

Nemex

Nemex Art

Classification: The Nemesis Pokémon
Type: Dark/Ghost
Description: A destructive force that is the opposite of the Cosmic Architect. This Pokémon periodically causes mass extinctions on Earth.
Does Not Evolve

Trivia: Little is known about this mysterious Pokémon that opposes the Cosmic Architect in many ancient myths. It seems to be an entity of pure destruction and malice that lives on the extreme edge of the Solar System. It can exert its sinister influence over vast distances to cause rampant destruction. It is believed to be the cause the periodic mass extinctions that plague the Earth, including the one that wiped out the Fossil Pokémon.

Nemex’s name combines the concepts of Nemesis and Planet X, two theoretical celestial bodies on the fringe of the Solar System whose gravitational influence possibly leads to mass extinctions on Earth. Nemesis would be a brown dwarf star and Planet X a ninth planet. Concepts of both are woven into Nemex’s design. It is the second of Tenno’s event-exclusive Legendaries.

Signature Move and Ability:
Sinister Influence
The will of the user is exerted from afar, bringing disaster to the target.
Type: Dark/Ghost
Category: Special
Power: 130
Accuracy: 85
PP: 5

Cycle of Destruction
All other Pokémon take damage at the end of each turn.

In-Depth Page

I know it’s been a long while, but this post is my way of promising that Nemex Unleashed is coming soon. It’s been a busy summer, but I’m back to work on writing. Shouldn’t be too much longer now.

Showakusei

Showakusei
Classification: The Asteroid Pokémon
Type: Rock/Psychic
Description: According to myth, this Pokémon was originally a piece of rock in the asteroid belt that was given life by the Cosmic Architect. Now it serves the Architect by watching over the solar system.
Does not Evolve

Trivia:  The name Showakusei comes from the Japanese word for asteroid. Showakusei lives deep beneath Tenno Minor in the Crater Cave, a recently discovered extension of the Crater Gate, where it guards a Grand Meteoric Shard, just like the other Cosmic Guardians.

In-Depth Page