Episode 79 Review

It should be noted that I took some liberty with the gym battle, when compared to its in-game counterpart. Mainly, the battle with Allen is not normally a double battle. What actually inspired me initially to do so was trying to solve a problem. In addition to the two of Allen’s Pokémon seen already, Allen also uses a Lunatone and Solrock in in the games. The problem is that since the show uses three-on-three as its battle standard, Allen needed a third Pokémon, but couldn’t use his fourth, and it would be very awkward for him to use either Lunatone or Solrock, but not the other. So I needed an excuse for Allen to only use two Pokémon. The solution was a two-on-two double battle. Another benefit of this format that became apparent to me was that I would be able to show off the partnership between Arborrior and Eagladiator that I’ve been building up. The other liberty I took was actually Eatyai. Way back when I first made my game concepts, Eatyai was supposed to be Allen’s signature Pokémon. But when thinking about it recently, I realized this couldn’t work. The problem is that Elgyem doesn’t evolve into Beheeyem until level 42, and therefore the minimum level for an Eatyai is 43. But being the fifth gym of a region means that Allen’s Pokémon should be somewhere in the range of level 35. 43 is just pushing it too much, and I didn’t want to give him an impossibly under-leveled Pokémon either. So I made Yuifoe his signature Pokémon instead and gave him an Elgyem to fill the last spot. But for these episodes, I knew I wanted to use Allen in order to introduce Eatyai.

As I say in every review of a gym battle episode, I like to have each one show off a different skill and/or trait of Ash that proves how good of a trainer he is. This time around, it was Ash’s ability to not take the easy option, and instead prioritize a more clever one, as shown by his choice of Pokémon. One would assume picking to Fighting-Types to battle against to Psychic-Types would be a bad choice, but Ash knew that any short-term gain he could achieve with type advantages would be outweighed by the long-term advantage of the strong partnership of his Pokémon.

Also of note in this episode was Pikachu’s participation in the battle, despite the fact that it didn’t actually battle. I like Pikachu taking part in as many gym battles as possible, but I just couldn’t give up either Arborrior or Eagladiator’s spots, so Pikachu needed to sit out this one, but I still wanted it to contribute to Ash’s win. So I took a page out Ash’s battle with Olympia in Kalos, where Pikachu was instrumental in Ash’s victory, due to its ability to predict when the Future Sight attack was going to land. I tried to replicate and expand upon that concept. I think I improved on it myself, as anyone could have figured out the amount of time it takes for Future Sight to inflict damage, but only an Electric-Type like Pikachu could detect the Eerie Impulse.

Speaking of Ash’s battle with Olympia, an interesting fact of trivia that someone pointed out to me in a review, is that of Ash’s three battles with Psychic-Type Gym Leaders (Sabrina, Liza/Tate, and Olympia), two of them were double battles (Liza/Tate and Olympia). So, in a way, making this a double battle served to continue a tradition.

My Anime Favorites

The anime 20th Anniversary is only a week out, so I thought a cool way to celebrate would be to go through as many categories as I can think of and rank my favorite aspects of the anime. This will be a long post, so let’s get started.

Favorite Episode
Image result for island of the giant pokemonIsland of the Giant Pokémon:
I love this episode so much. The obvious reason is the sequence where we actually get to see (well, technically read) Pokémon talk for the first and only time. The likely reason that this happened was because it was still so early on in the series that the writers didn’t know if they could get away with just having a group of Pokémon with no humans to interpret what they’re saying. We all know from modern episodes that they were wrong, and that an episode with a group of Pokémon and no humans works just fine. That being said, it was still incredibly fun to have this one time to actually see what Pokémon are saying directly, instead of just having to figure it out based on context. This translation of the Pokémon’s words also gave us an analysis into the mindset of Pokémon like Ekans and Koffing who have evil masters, and yet don’t find themselves to be evil. The one other thing that I love about this episode was the “supernatural” aspect to it. Even if the giant Pokémon turned out to be just robots, we went the entire episode thinking they were real, creating one of the more unique scenarios in the entire series.
Honorable Mentions: Pokémon  I Chose You!, Charizard Chills, and Battling the Enemy Within

Continue reading

Episode 72 Review

First off, remember that Cosmic Chronicles Review I promised last time? Sorry about that, I’ve been too busy to get around to it. Hopefully I’ll have it up within the next two days.

As you are well aware by now, this episode was the first of a multi-episode space camp arc. I was inspired to write these episodes by the fact that it seems like almost every region has its own summer camp arc of some kind, such the ones seen in the Sinnoh episode Camping it Up, or the Kalos episode Summer of Discovery. However, this being the Tenno Region, obviously that summer camp had to be a space camp instead. And on that train of thought, what better way to start off a space camp experience than actually travelling into outer space? That’s pretty much the origin of the episode’s plot.

Speaking of the Cosmic Chronicles from earlier, another important factor of this episode was the introduction of the character Braydon to Cosmic Quest. If you haven’t read the Cosmic Chronicles (which you really should), then you should know that Braydon first appeared in Chapter 2 of the Cosmic Chronicles. Braydon originates as the rival in Luna, Terra, and Sol Versions. As such, he is automatically linked to the character Brandon from Cosmic Chronicles, as he is the main playable character, so it was natural to introduce him there. But like other rivals from the game, such as Gary, Barry, and Bianca, it made sense to also introduce him to Cosmic Quest as a rival for Ash. As Braydon came from Launch Town, the space camp arc seemed like the perfect way to bring him into Cosmic Quest, and since the episode of Cosmic Chronicles took place immediately before this episode, it was the perfect way to make a connection between the two series. Braydon is actually the first major connection to be made.

Episode 60 Review

Safari Zones (and variants thereof) seem to pretty much be ignored in the anime, with the exception the episode in Kanto (which was banned). Hoenn’s Safari Zone was completely ignored while the Great Marsh in Sinnoh was used simply as the location for a random episode, the fact that it was used for Safari Games was never addressed. As Cosmic Quest is the main way to show off my ideas from Luna, Terra, and Sol, I didn’t want to leave the Park Zone out. Speaking of the Safari Zone in the anime, just as I did previously with the Porygon episode, this episode featured a joke where Ash forgot about the events that took place during a banned episode, reflecting the fact that most English viewers would have no idea what they’re talking about. Another joke this episode made was Ash failing to catch a Dunsparce. For some reason it would appear that whenever Ash tries and fails to capture a Pokémon that it’s a Dunsparce. This has been seen twice now, once in the Unova episode The Path that Leads to Goodbye and again in the Kalos episode Under the Pledging Tree. I figured if I was going to have Ash fail to capture a Pokémon, that I might as well continue the joke and make it a Dunsparce as well.

An interesting fact about this episode, and the Pokémon featured in it, is its origin. Traineed and Arborrior are actually two of some of my very earliest Pokémon (alongside “Megachu,” Delphin, and Ivine). As a child when I created these Pokémon, I would play make believe with my friends using them. One scenario that I always reused was that the person I’m playing with would be training by attacking a tree, and out of that tree a group of Traineed (back then given the uninspired name of Seedona) would fall. One of these feisty Pokémon  would challenge the trainer and end up finding a Leaf Stone (the original evolution method that I recently changed) and evolve into Arborrior (known as Treeona back then). This event would always occur before the trainer fights a Grass-Type gym (this was in a proto-region I created before Tenno). Wanting to give the trainer a Pokémon that is good against Grass-Types, I would have the captured Arborrior know Fire Punch. I took this original scenario and transformed it into this episode. If I had been able to write a longer episode, then there would have been one final battle between Arborrior and Breloom, representing the battle against the Grass gym leader.

Finally, I want to take this chance to give my opinion on Safari Zones. I’ve seen a lot of people complain about the Safari Zone and how annoying it is. I personally cannot agree with this at all. Not only do I not think it’s too difficult, but I think it’s a great thing to have. It is an area that completely changes all of the conventions about capturing Pokémon, leading to a completely unique experience found nowhere else. It adds variety to the game, and I really don’t know how that can be a bad thing. I personally hope strongly that Sun and Moon sees the return of the Safari Zone, and I don’t mean excuses like the Friend Safari or that pale imitation we see in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. I want an actual Safari Zone with an actual Safari Game.

Episode 48 and 49 Review

This idea was obviously meant to be a celebration of the past 20 years of Pokémon. From big things like the return of Gary and Mewtwo to smaller things like a recurring theme of the number 20 (by the way viginti, as in Project Viginti, is Latin for 20), it was all over the place. It would be too much to specifically go over every little joke and reference I made, but they should be easy enough to find.

The idea for this episode can be traced way back to before I had even considered writing Cosmic Quest, back to when Genesect and the Legend Awakened first came out. I’m sure I’m not alone when I say that I was immediately disappointed that the Mewtwo in the movie was not the same Mewtwo I grew up with. In all honesty, the Mewtwo present there was very disappointing. I wanted to watch a movie about a fierce and invincible demigod-like being with an inbred hatred towards humanity, not some random arrogant psychic lady who’s indifferent towards humans. But soon after that movie, with the existence of Mega Mewtwo X known, my brother and I came up with the theory that an upcoming movie would feature a battle between the two Mewtwo, with the original Mewtwo becoming Mega Mewtwo X. At this point, that ever actually happening seems extremely unlikely, as we are now at the end of Kalos’ lifespan, and it’s during Kalos they would want to use the Mega Mewtwo. But, I did realize soon after starting Cosmic Quest that I could work that idea into my own episode. As the 20th Anniversary approached, I decided that I wanted to do a 20th Anniversary special. I quickly realized that a battle of the Mewtwo would be a perfect anniversary plot.

In reference towards the name of the episodes, Attack of Clones, I want to explain my logic. I, one day, had a sudden realization that whenever Mewtwo pops up, it is in movie/special that has name that seems to be linked to a Star Wars title. It first appears in Mewtwo Strikes Back, similar to The Empire Strikes Back. Then it appears in Mewtwo Returns, like Return of the Jedi. And finally we have Genesect and the Legend Awakened, similar to The Force Awakens. Therefore, I could not resist making a Star Wars joke here, and Attack of the Clones was the obvious choice.

One last thing I have to mention is some last minute changes I made. I had actually finished both episodes the Wednesday before the anniversary, that means that they were complete before the announcement of Sun and Moon. I went in right before publishing the episodes and added the Sun and Moon references to both Team Rocket’s reward jokes and to Mew’s speech. Originally the reward joke (the one where they mention the names of every Pokémon game) had Meowth saying something about speculating that they’d be catching Z’s on beds made of money, as current speculation inferred Z was to be the next game. But with the announcement of Sun and Moon I changed the line to being about the Sun and Moon. To further the joke, I added the extra statement about never being able to catch Z’s as a jab at the fact that Z Version will almost certainly not happen.

The anniversary may be past us, but always remember to train on!

Opinion Piece: Pokémon Sun and Moon Versions

NEWSFLASH: After today’s Pokémon Direct, Sun and Moon have been confirmed. There was no solid indication from what was shown whether it was a Generation 6 or Generation 7 game, but some of the wording being used to describe it on the main website does seem to infer it’s a new generation. If that is the case, my below theory may be disregarded. That being said, I am not yet 100% convinced that this is a new generation.

As I am sure most of you already know, earlier today trademarks for games called Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon, complete with logos, where uncovered. Normally I avoid talking about news on this website, but for obvious reasons, I thought it would be worth bringing up here. I want to share my vision for these games. Before we begin though, I would like to point out the very real possibility that these trademarks will not lead anywhere. Pokémon has trademarked many game titles before, such as Gray or Water Blue, without an actual game coming out with the name. But, never to my knowledge have one of those fake trademarks come complete with logos the day before a major Pokémon announcement.

Many people are assuming that Sun and Moon will be the first games of the Seventh Generation of Pokémon, and for a good reason too. However, this does not seem likely. One important thing to remember is that whatever games they release this year will be on the 3DS. But coming soon is the Nintendo NX. It would be a poor business choice on Game Freak’s part to release a new generation right before the release of a new system. Also, the Gen 6 story line is incomplete. Zygarde has yet to be fully explored, and X and Y left many questions. That is why I believe that Sun and Moon will introduce the brand new concept of Generation 6.5. For those who don’t know the Gen 6.5 theory, it’s an idea that the next game will bring about what could be considered a new generation (eg. new Pokémon and a new region), but still remain firmly linked to Gen 6. This theory has gathered evidence from all over, with the biggest points being the small number of Pokémon introduced in X and Y, seemingly missing Pokémon from X and Y such as a non-cover Legendary Trio, and the mysterious item known as the Strange Souvenir, which refers to the player travelling to an unknown region sometime soon. The recently revealed Magearna also seems to support the theory.

With that explained, my theory for how these games might work is to start the player off in the new region referred to by the Strange Souvenir. This region will have new Pokémon, such as Magearna, and a new story. It is very possible, though, that this story will tie into the story of X and Y, delving deeper into the Kalos War and involving Team Flare. While it is possible that Zygarde would be the center point of the story, this seems unlikely, as there are two games, each of which needs its own cover Pokémon. As there is only one Zygarde Complete, this would not work well, unless Zygarde gets a second complete form. So I believe that two new Legendaries will be the focus (ones based on the Sun and Moon). Then, after this story is seen to completion and you enter this region’s Hall of Fame, you get to travel to the Kalos Region. Once in the Kalos Region a new story involving Zygarde as its center focus will unravel (this would be like a combination of Gold and Silver’s Kanto Region with Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire’s Delta Episode). This would allow for Zygarde to get the spotlight that it would miss otherwise with the absence of a Z Version. A full on second story occurring post-game also makes sense given the current progression of Gen 6 games. X and Y had the Looker story, the first attempt by Pokémon to have a story after beating the game. Then Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire had the Delta Episode, which was a full-on narrative with an impact on the story of the entire game. The type of story in Kalos I suggest only seems like the natural progression of things. This complete overhaul to the game would explain why there is no Z/X2 and Y2 Version, as it would justify the changing of the name entirely.

There are those out there who say that what I’m suggesting is silly because a new Pokémon game with new Pokémon and a new region automatically makes it a new generation, so this would be Gen 7, not 6.5. I disagree. I say that there’s more to a generation than just the Pokémon. The three biggest factors being game style, story, and connectivity. Each generation introduces an improved style from the previous one. If Sun and Moon have the same style as X and Y, that pretty much confirms they’re in the same generation. On top of that, if these games have a story connection to X and Y, then all they’re doing is continuing this generation’s storyline. And if they can trade/battle with X and Y (with the exception of newly introduced Pokémon), how could they be a different generation? Admittedly, Gold and Silver could trade with Red and Blue, and did connect with them story wise, but I argue that was only because Gold and Silver was the first time they made a new generation. they were uncertain of what they wanted to do. Something like that in the modern age would never happen. Also, the concept of a Gen 6.5 would be a good way to expand upon and top the concepts of sequel versions introduced in in Gen 5 with Black and White 2.

Please remember, this is all just my opinion and what I personally see to be a good possibility. Now, will this development have any major impact on Cosmic Quest? We’ll just have to wait and see…

Train on!

Mega Spiritomb

Mega Spiritomb

Description: The power of Mega Evolution allows for Spiritomb to break free from its Odd Keystone prison. The 108 evil spirits that form Spiritomb can now be seen orbiting it. Without the Keystone containing it, it gains great power, in the form of increased Special Attack and Speed. Its Mega Ability, Sinister Shadows, protects it from damage by Light and Fairy-Type moves, its only weaknesses.  When it returns to its original form after battle, the mystic properties of the Odd Keystone cause it to repair itself, sealing Spiritomb once more, until the next time it Mega Evolves.
Mega Stone: Spiritombite
Type: Ghost/Dark
Mega Ability: Sinister Shadows (New Ability, See Abilitydex)

Trivia: In case you couldn’t tell already, I love the more gimmicky Mega Evolutions. Instead of the Pokémon just growing bigger and stronger, I like it to have a story. Mega Spiritomb was the result of its story of breaking out of the Odd Keystone, and its ability. One of the things that bugged me when Fairy-Types first came out was that both Sableye and Spiritomb now had a weakness. Pre-Kalos, both Pokémon were the only ones to not have a single weakness, and in all honesty, it was about the only thing the two had going for them. Fairies ruined that. Of course I went and made things worse by adding the Light-Type, which gave both of them something they were x4 weak to. By granting Mega Spiritomb the Sinister Shadows ability, I have fixed this problem for Spiritomb, allowing it to regain its former glory. While designing Mega Spiritomb, I was going for the more grotesque Lovecraftian design. The multiple faces as well as the spirits entering and emerging from the body represent the fact that Spiritomb is an amalgamation of 108 spirits.