Exploring the Pokémon Multiverse

If you haven’t seen yet, I’ve recently updated the History of the Pokémon World page with details regarding the recent Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee. Of course, Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee didn’t add to much of note to the page, seeing as Let’s Go doesn’t have too much in the way of lore, however, with this addition, I have updated the entire page to better detail page when it comes to the multiverse of Pokémon. As explained there, the page will focus and detail the four primary branches of the Pokémon Multiverse, as follows:

OU: Original Universe. The timeline introduced in the original games and seen up until Black and White 2.
MU: Mega Universe. The timeline where Mega Evolution exists, as introduced in X and Y.
UU: Ultra Universe. A minor branch off of the Mega Universe. So far, only Ultra Sun and Moon exists here.
LG:  Let’s Go Universe. The timeline where Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee takes place.

I couldn’t really detail the intricacies of the split Pokémon timeline too much on the page, so I thought I should make a post to better describe my thoughts on how this all works.

First, for those who don’t know, a multiverse is the idea that multiple parallel universes can exist. Each of the individual universes can either be almost exactly the same as another, or completely different. In the quantum theory of the multiverse, every time a choice is made, the universe splits. In one universe, one option is picked, in another, the other option is instead. This happens over and over again, in a cascading effect, quickly creating an infinite amount of universes, across which anything and everything has happened in at least one of them. These universes splitting off of each other can be thought of as a tree, where branches grow off of other branches. Some branches are tiny twigs, while others are thick limbs. Using this analogy, branches of the timeline can be grouped. Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire confirmed that Pokémon exists in a multiverse, by stating that there is another version of the Hoenn Region in another world. This is heavily implied to be the version of Hoenn seen in the original Ruby and Sapphire games, explaining the differences between the two sets of games.

So now comes the question, where did I get the “four primary branches” concept from. From the context of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire mentioned above, we know that there are at least two main branches to the Pokémon timeline. There’s the one without Mega Evolution, the Original Universe, and the one with Mega Evolution, the Mega Universe. The split occurred based on the firing of AZ’s Ultimate Weapon. The Mega Universe is where he chose to fire it, the Original Universe is where he didn’t. These two branches are the main branches of the primary four.

The next universe to be introduced is the Ultra Universe, where the events of Ultra Sun and Moon take place. Compared to the split between the Original and Mega Universes, this one is pretty small. So you can think of it as a small branch growing off of the thick limb of the Mega Universe. This universe is essentially the same as the Mega Universe, the only known major differences being those that stem directly from the actions of Necrozma. It is unknown exactly what the point of divergence is, but the main differences come from Necrozma interrupting the events at the Alter of the Sunne/Moone. It’s possible that Necrozma simply decided not to attack in the original Mega Universe, but it’s also possible that split occurred much earlier, and perhaps Necrozma was never imprisoned in the Megalo Tower to begin with in the Mega Universe. It’s impossible to know for sure.

Then there’s the Let’s Go Universe. Not much explanation is needed here. Let’s Go presents events completely differently from Red and Blue/Fire Red and Leaf Green. The main difference is that the protagonists of Let’s Go, Chase, replaces Red. Since Mega Evolution exists, it would be a branch off of the Mega Universe timeline Once again, there is no confirmation as to why this split occurred. It is my speculation that in this version, Red and Blue began their journey earlier than they did in the Original and Mega Universe, meaning that missed out on the random events that led to them becoming the trainers we know them as. However, it’s worth noting that Chase and Trace live in the Original Universe houses of Red and Blue, meaning that there are other unrelated differences to this universe as well.

All this leaves a big question. Why are Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire and Ultra Sun/Moon considered their own universe, but not Fire Red/Leaf Green and Emerald? The answer to that question is, they actually are. While the multiverse may have only been introduced officially in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, it had existed since the very beginning. In fact, the very nature of Pokémon’s dual version releases (as in releasing both Red Version and Blue Version) means that timeline splits existed with the very first Pokémon games. Red and Blue Versions both show the events, but with slightly different versions of them. That is, by definition, a presentation of parallel universe. And it doesn’t end there. Yellow Version later came out, creating a third split in the timeline. And then, ten years later, there came Fire Red and Leaf Green, creating two more versions of the same events. The reason I do not list these as separate universes is because they all just minor twigs on the same main branch of the timeline. Fire Red/Leaf Green shows essentially the same universe as Red/Blue, with minor differences, while Let’s Go Pikachu/Eevee does not. Emerald is just a slightly different version of the same events from Ruby and Sapphire, and can mostly coexist with them, but Ultra Sun/Moon has some major events that are completely different from Sun/Moon, making it a bigger divergence.

The multiverse gets even crazier when you consider the implications of the Link Cable mentioned in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. In it, the Link Cable is a mysterious item that allows Devon Corp. to send the incoming meteor to another world. So, essentially, it is a machine that allows transport and communication with other universe. Now, the Link Cable was made as a reference to the real-world object that allowed Game Boy games to connect to each other. It’s what allowed players to trade and battle with other players. Now, let’s think about the implications. In Red Version, we have one Red connecting to another Red and trading using the Link Cable. Since the first Red can now use the Pokémon received from the second one in the trade, that second Red is, technically speaking “cannon” to the first Red’s journey. The only way for this work means that literally every single save file ever created on a Pokémon game is its own parallel universe. Think about it. The Pokémon multiverse truly is infinite in its expanse.

And all that’s not even considering other big non-game branches of the timeline, such as the anime, manga, trading card, and spin-off game universe.

If any of this post doesn’t seem to make sense to you, feel free to ask in a comment. I’d be more than willing to explain better.

Episode 87 Review

WOBBUFFET!

What I mean to say is, I absolutely adore this episode. I think it’s easily one of my favorites. Wobbuffet is easily one of my favorite Pokémon characters in the entire series. How can one not love that intrusive blue blob? An interesting fact is that Wobbuffet is the Pokémon in the show with the third most appearances, falling only behind Pikachu and Meowth. Even among all characters, human or Pokémon, it has the sixth most appearances, behind Ash, Pikachu, Jessie, James, and Meowth. Despite this seriously impressive record, Wobbuffet has only ever had four episodes truly dedicated to it. Those episodes are its debut appearance in the Johto episode Tricks of the Trade, another Johto episode, 30 episodes later, in Wobbu-Palooza, and then The Wayward Wobbuffet 20 episodes after that. After The Wayward Wobbuffet it wouldn’t be for nearly another 700 episodes and 14 years that Wobbuffet was given its next dedicated episode in the Kalos episode A Fork in the Road! A Parting of Ways! To date, it has now been about 140 episodes since then, and not another one has appeared. The fact that Wobbuffet went 700 episodes and 14 years without an episode, having no dedicated episode whatsoever in Hoenn or Sinnoh (Unova too, but that doesn’t count for obvious, yet unfortunate, reasons), is absolutely insane for a Pokémon that has appeared as much as Wobbuffet has. It makes no sense that a Pokémon that has literally appeared in over 700 episodes over the course of the past 18 years, would only have these four episodes dedicated to it, and how few and far between the ones it does get are. Pokémon that only appeared for one region and a mere fraction of Wobbuffet’s episodes have more dedicated episodes to their name. With that all being said, I knew that it was absolutely mandatory for me to not only make a Wobbuffet-centric episode, but to go all-out with it.

This episode was inspired by the aforementioned episode, The Wayward Wobbuffet. It was a fun episode in which Wobbuffet gets separated from Team Rocket and we get to witness its wacky adventure. This was always one of my favorite episodes, and is certainly my favorite Wobbuffet-centric episode, so I decided to take it’s concept and scale it up for my own Wobbuffet episode. I wanted to put Wobbuffet in the most random, bizarre, and incredible circumstances I could come up with. I wanted an episode as wacky and outrageous as Wobbuffet itself. And that’s exactly what I ended up with.

Among the many strange things I had Wobbuffet do, one probably stood out more than the others, the cooking competition show called Sliced. If you didn’t know already, this was a parody of the real-life Food Network show called Chopped, which is pretty much the exact same thing as what I portrayed in Sliced. I really enjoy that show, so when I decided that one step of Wobbuffet’s misadventure would be on a cooking show, I knew it had to be a parody of Chopped.

Episode 60 Review

Safari Zones (and variants thereof) seem to pretty much be ignored in the anime, with the exception the episode in Kanto (which was banned). Hoenn’s Safari Zone was completely ignored while the Great Marsh in Sinnoh was used simply as the location for a random episode, the fact that it was used for Safari Games was never addressed. As Cosmic Quest is the main way to show off my ideas from Luna, Terra, and Sol, I didn’t want to leave the Park Zone out. Speaking of the Safari Zone in the anime, just as I did previously with the Porygon episode, this episode featured a joke where Ash forgot about the events that took place during a banned episode, reflecting the fact that most English viewers would have no idea what they’re talking about. Another joke this episode made was Ash failing to catch a Dunsparce. For some reason it would appear that whenever Ash tries and fails to capture a Pokémon that it’s a Dunsparce. This has been seen twice now, once in the Unova episode The Path that Leads to Goodbye and again in the Kalos episode Under the Pledging Tree. I figured if I was going to have Ash fail to capture a Pokémon, that I might as well continue the joke and make it a Dunsparce as well.

An interesting fact about this episode, and the Pokémon featured in it, is its origin. Traineed and Arborrior are actually two of some of my very earliest Pokémon (alongside “Megachu,” Delphin, and Ivine). As a child when I created these Pokémon, I would play make believe with my friends using them. One scenario that I always reused was that the person I’m playing with would be training by attacking a tree, and out of that tree a group of Traineed (back then given the uninspired name of Seedona) would fall. One of these feisty Pokémon  would challenge the trainer and end up finding a Leaf Stone (the original evolution method that I recently changed) and evolve into Arborrior (known as Treeona back then). This event would always occur before the trainer fights a Grass-Type gym (this was in a proto-region I created before Tenno). Wanting to give the trainer a Pokémon that is good against Grass-Types, I would have the captured Arborrior know Fire Punch. I took this original scenario and transformed it into this episode. If I had been able to write a longer episode, then there would have been one final battle between Arborrior and Breloom, representing the battle against the Grass gym leader.

Finally, I want to take this chance to give my opinion on Safari Zones. I’ve seen a lot of people complain about the Safari Zone and how annoying it is. I personally cannot agree with this at all. Not only do I not think it’s too difficult, but I think it’s a great thing to have. It is an area that completely changes all of the conventions about capturing Pokémon, leading to a completely unique experience found nowhere else. It adds variety to the game, and I really don’t know how that can be a bad thing. I personally hope strongly that Sun and Moon sees the return of the Safari Zone, and I don’t mean excuses like the Friend Safari or that pale imitation we see in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. I want an actual Safari Zone with an actual Safari Game.

Episode 50 Review

Suffice it to say that this episode only exists in the first place because I needed an excuse for Misty to appear for the past several episodes. But it developed into an episode with much more importance. One such factor was the introduction of Tyde. I’ve been wanting to introduce my Elite Four for a while now, but it is somewhat hard to get a good enough reason for them to show up. It’s kind of a shame the way that the Elite Four is normally shown in the show. Ash may have met all of the Kanto Elite Four, but it took up until the Battle Frontier to do so (and technically he didn’t even meet Lance as an Elite Four, but a Champion). He never met Koga as an Elite Four and never met Karen at all. In Hoenn he only met Drake and none of the others. In Unova only Caitlin appeared, and that wasn’t until towards the end of the region. And so far in Kalos Siebold and Malva have only appeared in the Mega Evolution Specials, not the main series, and Wikstrom got a tiny cameo in a movie. Sinnoh is the only region so far that handled its Elite Four well and introduced all of them over the course of the region. I hope to do the same.

Another point worth mentioning for this episode was Misty’s send-off. Of all of Ash’s travelling companions to have a goal, Misty is probably the one who made the smallest strides towards said goal. She did win the Whirl Cup, but that was really all she did. In her send-off I wanted to give her an even more major step. So beyond just having her win the Splash Cup, I gave her the set up that promises to make her into a true Water-Type master. That was a proper send-off for her I believe.

Episode 28 Review

I don’t think there’s a single person out there who didn’t like Jigglypuff back in the early series (because it was before it became a Fairy-Type). I knew early on that Jigglypuff would have to come back in Cosmic Quest. Jigglypuff was just such a fun character to watch, and its shame the way it went out. Jigglypuff’s last episode was also its first appearance in Hoenn (that’s why the person on the airplane mentioned picking Jigglypuff up in the Hoenn Region). It was the episode “A Poké-BLOCK Party!” where it really just kind of appeared at random like it would in any other episode. It was given no form of finale of goodbye. It seems like the writers thought they would use it in Hoenn, but decided against it and just faded it out. It is such a shame. So I’ve decided that Jigglypuff deserves to return to the spotlight. As for this episode specifically, I actually had no idea what I was going to do for the reintroduction of Jigglypuff up until I actually started writing the episode. I had the fun little idea for the first scene on the airplane, which I originally meant to be the introduction of Jigglypuff, but the rest of the episode was unplanned until last minute. As I was writing the airplane scene, it occurred to me that because no one knew or expected that Jigglypuff was coming back, it be fun to expand the idea of a horror-like scene used in the first scene to the rest of the episode. I was very proud of the way it turned out, and I think I did Jigglypuff justice. You can expect Jigglypuff to reappear now.

 

Seluna and Terratlas

And here they are, the cover Pokémon of Luna and Terra Versions (If you haven’t seen the actual covers yet, make sure to check out the previous post):

Seluna
Seluna

Classification: The Lunar Pokémon
Type: Dark/Rock
Description: According to myth and legend, Seluna, under the guidance of the Cosmic Architect, created all of the moons in the solar system. It’s crowning achievement is the Earth’s moon, where it is said to dwell.
Does not Evolve

Trivia: Seluna is the cover Pokémon of Luna Version. The pattern on its upper chest is meant to invoke the actual Moon. It’s name is derived from Selene, the Greek goddess of the Moon, combined with Luna, the scientific term for the Moon. It’s red eyes are meant to invoke the theme of having a “red” legendary each generation, such as Ho-oh, Groudon, Palkia (it’s more of a pink, but close enough), Reshiram (it glows red), and Yveltal, all of which are based off of Red Version and Charizard.

Terratlas
Terratlas

Classification: The Terra Pokémon
Type: Ground/Water
Description: In legend, Terratlas was created by the Cosmic Architect in order to construct the planets of the solar system. It is said to have modeled the Earth in its own image. It is rumored to live in high Earth orbit, always watching its prized creation.
Does not Evolve

Trivia: Terratlas is the cover Pokémon of Terra Version. Its name is a combination of the Latin term terra, meaning the Earth, and Atlas, the Greek Titan that held the Earth on its back. The main landmass on Terratlas’ stomach is meant look like the Kanto region, while the landmass on his shoulders (the one with the mountains) is meant to invoke Tenno, and the one on his hand with the volcano is meant to invoke Hoenn. The white on its head and feet are meant to be polar ice caps. Terratlas’ blue eyes are meant to relate it to the trend of having a blue legendary cover Pokémon, continuing the tradition of Lugia, Kyogre, Dialga, Zekrom (it glows blue), and Xerneas, all which stem from Blastoise back in Blue Version.

In addition, the Attackdex/Abilitydex has been updated with these Pokémon’s signature moves and abilities. Also, make sure to visit my Fan Fiction profile page to vote on which game you would pick.

Episode 14 Review

I’m finally back. What was your guy’s thoughts on Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire? I thought they were amazing games, probably some of the greatest to ever be made.

Anyways, as I’m sure you all know, this episode was made to commemorate the release of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. Back before I started writing, when I was brainstorming episode ideas, I knew that I wanted to do a Deoxys episode with Crate (Deoxys would actually be available in Sol Version as an Event Legendary). As the release of the games came closer, I decided that I wanted to make a Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire special, and since Deoxys is a Hoenn Pokémon I decided it would be best to use that episode idea. The idea to use Mega Deoxys came later. I was actually debating up until I started writing whether or not to use Mega Evolutions at all, since I originally made Luna/Terra/Sol before Mega Evolution was created. I was also nervous that I would put all that work into Mega Deoxys, only to have Mega Deoxys be announced as an actual Mega Evolution the following day upon the release of the games. I decided it was worth the risk.