Cycloptic

Cycloptic
The Telescope Pokémon
Type: Light/Steel
Description:  This Pokémon can see objects at great distances away. Its telescope eye grows with age, and the larger it gets, the further it can see.
Does not evolve

Trivia: Cycloptic is capable of standing still for hours at a time, focusing on one single point in order to collect as much light as possible, and to resolve a clear image. If this point moves, like a star in the sky, Cycloptic can pivot on its neck and its waist, and its telescope eye can be angled up and down, allowing it to track the object as necessary. It is not unusual to find this Pokémon completely dormant at night, as it takes in the sky above it.

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Cosmic Quest’s 4th Anniversary and “Concept Art”

Cosmic Quest may have began four years ago today, but it can trace its roots to much earlier. Often in the past I’ve discussed how Cosmic Quest can trace its beginnings back to my childhood, when I would create my own Pokémon and regions for fun. Most of the Pokémon I created back then have been scrapped due to not being up to par with my current standards, but every once in a while, I use a Pokémon in Cosmic Quest that dates back to these days. Recently, I found a drawing I made as a child of several of my very first Pokémon. Coincidentally, every Pokémon on this picture has made it into Cosmic Quest and my modern Tenno Dex. So, on Cosmic Quest’s 4th anniversary, I present to you this exclusive look at “concept art” of various Tenno Pokémon, in all it’s original, childish glory.

Please Note: The following image was created when I was a young child, and does not represent my current abilities, particularly my spelling.

Pokemon Concept Art

I drew this image a long time ago when I was sitting bored in my family’s restaurant. I created most of the Pokémon right there, on the spot, meaning that this was the point when I first came up with several of my current Pokémon. This was also the first time that I created completely original Pokémon. Previously, as I have explained before, I had already created the Pokémon “Megachu,” which also appears here, but this was the first time I created Pokémon that didn’t evolve from existing Pokémon. Alongside each Pokémon, I wrote its name, type, and several moves the Pokémon could learn. Let’s take a closer look at each Pokémon.

WispiritProto-Wispirit

Wispirit began life as Flarecar, the Fireball Pokémon. Originally, it was only a Fire-Type, not a Fire/Ghost-Type. The Pokémon was simply a living fireball, and had not yet invoked the Will-O-the-Wisp aspect. This would also be evident by the fact that it was originally colored a more traditional red, orange, and yellow, instead of blue-white. Wispirit’s Shiny coloration is a reference to this original design. The scribbles around the Pokémon’s body are there because I originally gave the Pokémon arms and legs, but later decided against it. So, like any child drawing with a pen, I scribbled them out. The moves listed for this Pokémon where Flamethrower, Fire Spin, Blast Burn, and Flame Wheel. Of immediate note is the move Blast Burn. At the time, I knew Blast Burn was the most powerful Fire-Type move, but I had no idea that only Fire-Type Starter Pokémon could learn it. Of minor note is that Wispirit does not learn Flamethrower through level-up and does not Fire Spin at all.

Beneath Flarecar is its evolution, Flamcar, or what is currently known as Infearno. This is the only Pokémon on the drawing that has yet to be revealed. So enjoy your sneak peak of this Pokémon. Just keep in mind, this Pokémon will likely change in some major way when it is actually released.

TraineedProto-Traineed

The Pokémon you know as Traineed was created as Seedona. What’s striking about this Pokémon is how little changed about it. A sprout was added to the top of its head, but otherwise, Seedona is just a child’s attempt at drawing Traineed. Its listed moves were Solar Beam, Low Kick, and Vine Whip. It is impossible for Traineed to learn any of these moves, but it does learn Low Sweep, instead of Low Kick.

ArborriorProto-Arborrior

Just as Traineed evolves into Arborrior, Seedona would evolve into Treeona. Also like Seedona, Treeona was changed little when Arborrior was modernized. Ignoring the limitations of a child’s drawings, the only real changes were the removal of the nose, lowering of the eyes from the leaves to the trunk, and the removal of the seeds hanging with the leaves. Yes, those little ovals are supposed to be seeds hanging from Treeona’s branches. In the original concept of Treeona, those hanging seeds were undeveloped Seedona, which would fall from the branches when matured enough to live on their own. Before developed, they could be picked from Treeona and eaten (I know, seems a little messed up, but I was kid who didn’t know any better). These features are represented in the abilities I made for Treeona, listed simply as Hatch and Eat. At the time, I had never played a Pokémon game before, and had no idea how abilities worked. Eat was simple enough, as it allowed Treeona to eat its own seeds and heals itself, while Hatch was much stranger. Hatch would allow a Seedona to fall from Treeona, and actually join the battle as its own Pokémon. Clearly this would not work in an actual game. While Arborrior’s seeds may no longer be present, a remnant of them still remains in its moveset. Arborrior can learn Leech Seed, Bullet Seed, Worry Seed, and Seed Bomb through level up, all as references to the era where it had these seeds physically present. Speaking of moves, Treeona’s listed moves were Focus Punch, Mega Punch, Frenzy Plant, and Solar Beam. Of these moves, the only one Arborrior can learn is Solar Beam, and that’s only via TM. Frenzy Plant once again shows my ignorance towards how certain moves work.

Mega RaichuProto-Mega Raichu

In a link up above, I already explained the history of Megachu, and how it became Mega Raichu. I do suggest you give it a read. This was actually the second drawing of Megachu I created. Unfortunately, I no longer possess the original version. As Megachu was the first Pokémon I created, it went through many changes as time went on. For example Mega Raichu’s twin tails were inspired by a later version of Megachu, while this version does not have them. The listed moves of Megachu where Thunder, Volt Tackle, Thunderbolt, and Iron Tail. As you might notice, this was simply moves that Ash’s Pikachu knew. Even though Megachu was originally designed to be an evolution of Pikachu, this image lists it as evolving from Raichu, meaning this picture was drawn after I learnt of Raichu’s existence.

DelphinProto-Delphin

Delphin was originally known as Dolphinda. This one was rather simple. There wasn’t a dolphin-based Pokémon yet, so I decided to make one. Of course, as a kid, that means simply drawing a crudely designed dolphin, distorting its name, and calling it a Pokémon. Being just a Pokémon version of a dolphin, it was a pure Water-Type, and had no traces of it’s hyper-intelligent traits present as Delphin. It’s listed moves were Water Gun, Hydro Pump, Hydro Blast, and Bite. Hydro Blast was either a move I made up, or my younger self’s attempt at remembering the name of Hydro Cannon. I honestly don’t remember. Given the fact that I gave Flamcar Blast Burn, and Treeona Frenzy Plant, the latter seems likely. Delphin does learn Water Gun, but does not learn Hydro Pump or Bite. And why would a dolphin Pokémon learn bite? Don’t ask me, I have no idea what I was thinking.

IvineProto-Ivine

Last on the list is the prototype of Ivine, Ivyna. The striking thing about this one is that pretty much nothing changed about it at all. Looking at the before and after image above, the two are practically the same, right down to the pose they stand in. I’ve explained before that I first created Ivine in a time before Tangrowth existed, so Tangela was just awkwardly sitting there without an evolution, practically begging to be given one. That’s how Ivyna was created. Ivyna was listed as learning the moves Vine Whip, Razor Leaf, Poison Sting, and Leech Seed. Of these moves, Ivine only learns Vine Whip.

And that’s it! I hope you all enjoyed this look into the history of Cosmic Quest. Happy anniversary, Cosmic Quest!